Episode 15: Eff It Living. An evidence-based way to beat stress and change your life. With John C. Parkin

In this episode, Rachel is joined by John C Parkin, author of the bestselling F**k It: The ultimate spiritual way, to talk about the powerful philosophy behind the F**k It mentality, and how using it can make our lives better. 

We chat about how the phrase F**k it is so powerful as it helps us form a bridge from our left brain to our right brain to access the very powerful, creative aspects of brains – the part of ourselves which lives in the present and helps us to truly relax. We discuss the concept that one of the reasons why we feel so stressed is that we attach too much meaning to too many things (what other people think of us being a prime example). When we relax, others relax and we get better outcomes in both work and life. 

We discuss how the F**k It principle might help busy doctors even with things that matter very much and how a bit of self-coaching (anabolic coaching – you heard it here first!) can help us to get some perspective, work out what really makes a difference in life, move forwards and take action to overcome stress and overload.

Put all your transcript content in here.

Podcast links

Podcast links

https://www.thefuckitlife.com 

Follow John on twitter @thefuckitlife

F**k It: The ultimate spiritual way book 

The Effect of Swearing of Strength and Power Performance, Keele University

https://www.facebook.com/thefkitlife/

Sign up for downloadable CPD reflection forms plus more tools and resources

For more episodes of You are not a frog, check out our website www.youarenotafrog.co.uk and sign up to our mailing list here for loads of useful resources about thriving at work. 

Follow Rachel on twitter @DrRachelMorris or LinkedIn and find out more about her online and face to face courses for doctors on surviving and thriving at work at www.shapesfordoctors.com or for other organisations at www.wildmonday.co.uk

Podcast transcript

Welcome to Episode 15 of You Are Not a Frog: Eff It Living an evidence based way to beat stress and change your life.

Rachel Morris

Welcome to you are not a frog, the podcast for GPs, hospital doctors and other busy people in high stress jobs. Working in today’s high stress environment, you may feel like a frog in boiling water. Things have heated up so slowly that you might not have noticed the extra long days becoming the norm. You’ve got used to feeling constantly busy and are often one crisis away from not coping. Let’s face it, frogs only have two choices: to stay in the pan and get boiled alive, or to hop out and leave. But you are not a frog, and that’s where this podcast comes in. You have many more choices than you think you do. There are simple changes that you can make, which will make a huge difference to your stress levels and help you enjoy life again. I’m your host Dr Rachel Morris, GPs and executive coach and specialist in resilience at work. I’ll be talking to friends, colleagues, and experts, all who have an interesting take on this so that together we can take back control to survive and really thrive in our work and lives.

Rachel Morris

I’d like to tell you about our new CPD forms. If you want to learn while you listen and claim CPD points, then go to the link in the show notes and sign up to receive our fully downloadable podcast CPD forms. Each one is populated with show notes and links so that you could listen, reflect and then note down what you’re going to do. A quick, easy and enjoyable way to do your CPD.

Rachel Morris

Hi, everyone. Before we start, I’ve got a couple of exciting updates to tell you about. Now firstly, I’m talking to a lot of GP training hubs, CEPNs, and LMCs about the resilience training programme that I run for GPs in the primary health care team and other doctors. Now they’ve been running really successfully over the last 12 to 18 months and we’re now also able to offer full training and support to train up GPs to run peer support groups. So we train GPs to facilitate these groups in their local area. So if you’re looking for a programme that will teach GPs to beat stress and take control of their work, then please get in touch with me or pass my details onto your local training hub. Secondly, in the new year, I’ll be launching my brand new online course, Beat, stress and thrive, the online course for doctors under pressure. If you’d like to him or about that, then sign up to my mailing list and keep an eye on social media. They’ll be lots more details coming out soon.

Rachel Morris

Now I am really excited about this episode of the podcast. This is where I interviewed the best selling author John Parkin or John C. Parkin, and he wrote a book called Fuck It the Ultimate spiritual way. I read this over the summer, and then I met John at a business retreat that I went on in September. The book really struck me. It lifted a lot of the weight off my shoulders about things I’ve been worrying about, and I thought that it would be really useful for listeners to the podcast just to listen to how the fuck it principal might work in their lives. Because one of the questions I asked John when I met him in September was, how does fuck it apply when actually, there are lots of things in our work and our lives that we can’t actually say fuck it to. So this discussion is really, really interesting. It brought up lots of things that were brand new principles to me. Um and we start off with thinking about actually, why do we need to use the words fuck it in the first place. So just a little bit of warning to our listeners, there will be a little bit of swearing on this podcast, but I think you’ll agree that it’s for a very good reason. So I hope you enjoy it.

Rachel Morris

So it’s brilliant to have with me here, John C. Parkin – is that C really important bit of your name John?

John C. Parkin

Being a C is a really important bit, but nobody ever knows what it stands for. But it stands for Charles.

Rachel Morris

Okay.

John C. Parkin

Yeah, but nobody ever knows that. But I think it’s important because I haven’t got doctor in front of my name like you have. So I’ve done – those of us without a doctor in front of their names put an initial for the American audience.

Rachel Morris

Ahh, it’s for the Americans.

John C. Parkin

It’s much easier to get than either medical training or a PHD. But just having a middle name and putting in an initial, it sounds almost is good you know.

Rachel Morris

It’s a bit of gravitas isn’t it John.

John C. Parkin

It is yeah.  It really is, it really works well. I’d recommend it to anybody who hasn’t got a doctor in front of their name.

Rachel Morris

Brilliant. Well, thank you so much for coming on the podcast. So we’re here to talk about your books and were the original fuck it books I’m told. And how many books have you written now?

John C. Parkin

Written is, we’ve got, like, I think three or four long written books.

Rachel Morris

Okay.

John C. Parkin

I’m hesitating because a couple of the books are little lines on a page with a drawing and I don’t think you can really count that as having written a book. So we’ve got three or four.

Rachel Morris

OK, brilliant.  And I –

Rachel Morris

Do they count then?

Rachel Morris

Yeah on the shelf up there. And I first heard John on a podcast and I thought it was really interesting. So I bought the book and read it on a holiday much to the shock and horror of my children. They were saying, Mother, you can’t read something with that in the title and I was saying oh no darlings, it’s really important, and it’s not what you think it is and all that sort of thing. So John, first of all, can I just ask you why the title? Why Fuck it?

John C. Parkin

We wrote the book originally I wrote the book originally after we’ve been using this phrase and then we shared it with some people. We were teaching retreat and we gave the advice to somebody who was very stressed. It was an English person living in Paris. She was really stressed out and  we said we advise her to say fuck it to all the stuff that was concerning her and this really worked for her. So we started to share it then. We were saying it. I mean, I’m not one who swears massively, but in this stressful times that we were having, and this is about 20 years ago, nearly 20 years ago now, we found that we were saying fuck it quite a bit to things, things that were kind of heavy and that we needed to let go of. And we realised it was quite an interesting way of letting go and relaxing, and nobody really talked about this thing as some form of relaxation technique. So that’s how we started. But it’s interesting to have something that people you know regard swearing as a bit, you know, it’s dirty, and you should really swear much. But actually this form of swearing and maybe quite a lot of forms of swearing can actually help you relax and relaxation is almost always a good thing. So that swearing could be a good thing was a really interesting thought.

Rachel Morris

I’ve been trying to think of other phrases you could use and none of them really come close do they.

John C. Parkin

They don’t and that’s the thing about it, because it’s from the beginning, really. And we started talking about this in about 2004 I think, in terms of sharing it and teaching and then writing about it. And I was constantly having to say, you know, this is not gratuitous use of this swear word. It genuinely can help you relax. It genuinely can help you let go of things. It can genuinely help you get perspective, and that’s a really good thing. So, yeah, and it’s not gratuitous. And since then there’s been various bits of research done about the power of swearing.

Rachel Morris

Oh really?

John C. Parkin

Yeah. I mean one example – there’s quite a lot now –  but the first bit that I read about that came out was from a guy at the University of Kiel. Can’t remember his name but I think if listeners just Google, fuck University of Kiel, they will get the bit of research. It might also wake up their PR department and wonder why people trolling them.

Rachel Morris

Yeah.

John C. Parkin

But this bit of research is about how he got – it sounds a rather sadistic experiment – but he got students to put their hand in buckets of ice water and – to create pain – to see how long they could keep their hands in the water and withstand the pain, doing various things. So they, I don’t want – they give them various things to say or think about or whatever. I don’t remember exactly how they did it. But one thing that he got them to do is to say, which is what a lot of us do when we hurt ourselves, he got them to say fuck, fuck, fuck, fuck. And it was the most effective, in the end,  pain reliever. They were able to keep their hands in the water for longer. So this became quite famous experiment because they’re saying the F word and they don’t know exactly what’s happening. They don’t know whether it’s releasing some, I don’t know what,  analgesic in the system. But it helps relieve pain. And that for me is good enough. It’s really interesting that this word is so strong. It has such strong associations with – for us – that just in that case, it can help us with stamina or can relieve pain. So now, shall I, I’ll mention one other bit of research that I, when I was looking at this ,and this is this is older actually. The discovery was that when we swear, it comes from a different part of the brain from the normal language. So normal language, I think, comes from the – I’m not a neuroscientist or a doctor – I’m just a C – so for those of more of a scientific bent, excuse my rather naive explanations of these things, are simplistic-er and naive. So the idea that the language mainly comes from the left brain and that the swear words are coming from the right brain. Just swear words. And I loved reading this because we’d said from years ago, without understanding any of that, because you know the old idea of what the left brain is and what the right brain is you know. The left brain’s more logical and the right brain is more creative and in the present and open and spiritually connected. So what we used to say, using that simplistic model of how the brain works was when we say fuck it, it’s like walking over a bridge from the left brain to the right brain. It’s like walking over a bridge from  inside of us that’s constantly concerned and worried, and thinking, and are worried about the future, and dwelling on the past , and very logical and anxious maybe, and walking over this bridge into the side of that brain. But I, well it’s what I imagine, I imagine you know dancing, being you know relaxing and lying back, and being very creative and playful and jokey, which is what I’m more like when I’m relaxed. And that’s – so that’s what it can do fuck it.

Rachel Morris

That’s such a good explanation. Yeah, you’re thinking all these things through logically, and actually when you say fuck it, what you’re doing is letting your creative side, the bit of you that’s present, the bit of you that probably knows what you need maybe more than the logical bit just to take over and go,  you know what? This. This is what’s important or this is what’s not important.

John C. Parkin

Absolutely.

Rachel Morris

Ah. I’ve never thought of it like that and that makes perfect sense. I always, you know, for in consultations, if you know patients are getting upset with you and they suddenly start swearing, then actually, that’s a really good sign that they’re no longer  rational.

John C. Parkin

Could be. Could be a good sign.

Rachel Morris

So well no, it’s a good sign to the doctor that they’re now no longer in rational, logical sort of telling your symptoms and they’ve tipped over into the emotional. And actually, that’s the point where probably things have to take a step back and you have to go actually, now, maybe we shouldn’t be having this conversation that, you know, I can see that things are getting a bit well, you’re being, frankly, very offensive. So we’re not going to take this conversation any further. And you know that’s interesting, isn’t it. So tell me how the whole fuck it principle, how would you describe that? What is it exactly?

John C. Parkin

To kind of continue that thought really. That’s it. Can we, if you don’t mind, let’s take that simplistic idea of the brain. I’ve spoken to people who know how the brain works, and it is a simplistic summary of how the brain works, but let’s stick with it almost like a metaphor. So there’s the left brain and the right brain, and the left brain, which is more logical, and past and future, and planning, and normal language – and the right brain, which is more relaxed and open, and present, and playful and creative.

John C. Parkin

Most of us spend most of our time in left brain, especially as grown ups.  So when we’re children we’re mainly right brain or alpha frequency in the brain is that generally. Whereas for adults, it’s beta frequency folks. So this difference in state, so as children we’re more, and we see that as kids and kids are more open, and playful and present and as adults we’re a lot more kind of worried and thinking about this and planning that and logical. So what we’re after as adults is to get more balance in our lives from solely being in that left brain state to being more relaxed and open and more right brain state. And that’s the problem. It’s mainly that we’re not in – we don’t have a balance. And so we tried to do it. You know, we desperately try to relax. We do some yoga. We go to – we watch a movie, we have a drink, whatever we do to try to relax and go a little bit into the right brain. We tried to do it, but it’s hard because a lot of the way society is structured now,  and our lives  are structured we’re thrown back into this left brain thinking. So essentially fuck it is one tool, and a very quick tool, that we can use to jump over and jump into the more relaxed thing because it’s unique. As well as being unique in its power in our language, it’s unique in what it points to. Because when we say fuck it, it points to the fact that we’re stressed, worried and stressing about too many things. That we’re regarding things as too important. So when you say fuck it, ahh you go fuck it. What you’re saying is that thing that’s stressing me can’t matter as much as my brain at the moment is perceiving it to matter. So that’s part of how fuck it works. You know we’re, as adults we are burdened by a whole range of stuff. We’re concerned about a whole range of stuff, and I talk about basically life being too meaningful, you know, in this kind of existential, the potential existential horror of things not meaning anything in the end. We create massive amounts of meaning, and a series of meanings, and a vast convoy of meanings in our lives, until our lives are so meaningful that any of those meanings that start to go wrong or potentially can go wrong causes stress. So it doesn’t have to be so meaningful. We can just relax a bit more and give up this kind of it’s so important and sit back and that is fuck it.

Rachel Morris

Wow and so how has that helped you to deal with various sort of stress in your life?

John C. Parkin

My story really is of being, which is pretty relevant for your audience I think, is being sick from very early in life. So from the age of about three, I suddenly became allergic to pretty much everything. I had very serious allergies, I had very serious asthma, and eczema when I was a child, so I spent a good amount of time in hospital and then, you know, ups and downs and I saw specialist when I was young and I was better for quite a while. But then in my early adulthood, I was not particularly well, so I was, you know, I was coping, I was managing, I was working, but I wasn’t well. So from an early age, really from, you know, whatever, 16, 17, 18, I started to recognise that stress was making it worse. Making my illnesses worse. And so from then it seems like a young age now, I was very interested in alternative health, relaxation, kind of the soft martial arts so tai chi and chi kung meditation. So from yeah, very young really, I was interested in that to help me calm down, because in the end, I mean, what is the way I saw it and see it is that the allergic response is your body looking at what are actually should be benign forces and treating them as the enemy.

Rachel Morris

Yeah.

John C. Parkin

So the body’s kind of overreacting to stuff it shouldn’t be, and so I suppose we’re all doing that in many ways. We’re you know, we’re exhibiting an emergency and stress response to being late to a fricking meeting, you know, and that’s, and that’s, so that’s what we’re, that’s what we’re talking about with fuck it. Getting things in perspective. So I have great experience in my body overreacting to things that it shouldn’t really be reacting to and they go, you know, the friendly forces. So there was a lot of collateral damage and friendly fire going on in my body and what I realised, you know, really, from really early was I needed to find ways to relax, and let go and not take things so seriously. And not get so bothered about things and not worry about things so much. And I come from a long line of warriors. Worries. Aha, with an O rather than an A. Be nice to be the A but it’s mainly the O. I should call myself John O. Parkin instead, and it’s the O of worry.

Rachel Morris

You’re a warrior worrier.

John C. Parkin

Yes. So that’s what I was dealing with really.

Rachel Morris

I think you know, so many of us are warriors and I think in the sort of jobs that we’re in sort of to worry is almost part of your job. I love the way you describe allergies as your body overreacting to stuff it shouldn’t be overreacting to.

John C. Parkin

Yes.

Rachel Morris

And actually that is so true in life overreacting. to, yeah, being late to that meeting or that that extra patient request, which is just sort of the straw that broke the camel’s back.

John C. Parkin

Yes.

Rachel Morris

But going back to this thing about meaning, it does seem a little bit counterintuitive even though it works. And I can testify that it works because I read the fuck it book on holiday. When? Why? That was when my children were very upset about seeing it on my sun lounger. And I know that you, in the fuck it book, you talk about having quite young twin boys at the time and being worried about their behaviour in public. And at one point you thought oh just fuck it. And by saying that it just sort of released all the worry and angst about it. So I tried that. My children were not being particularly well behaved in the restaurant and thought right, okay, I’m gonna try it. And I was getting all you know, sit down and don’t fill up your plate until you’ve eaten that and you know, can’t you just behave, and I just thought oh you know, fuck it. And as soon as I said fuck it, I became much nicer.

John C. Parkin

Yeah.

Rachel Morris

– and strangely, my children became much nicer. They actually started to behave.

John C. Parkin

Yes. Amazing, isn’t it?

Rachel Morris

How does that work?

John C. Parkin

Well, I think the effect of relaxation, which is what you’re pointing out there – relaxation has a tremendous effect on us and on the world and on our lives. And I know we’re kind of more in the, if we’re in the medical physiological thing, I think we all know what stress can do to the body and to our minds. Um,  the thing that I’ve studied most of is the eastern, you know bits of eastern, the piece to medicine, but more the daoist ideas from things like tai chi and chi kung and little bits of about how the principle behind acupuncture. Where the idea is, you know, you’ve got, it’s stress. And if you’re talking about energy in the Eastern Medicine, the idea is that the for health; simplest idea is that for health, energy, the energy of the body should flow and for health in your life, for your life to work, the energy in your life needs to flow. And now, it’s when we block the energy that illness arises. And we block the energy through stress and you know, extreme emotions. And we know that, we know that when we’re stressed, there’s a whole lot of blocking and getting stuff going on. So from both sides, this is the west and the east, maybe this is the left and the right brain as well, but from both sides. Well we know that stress is no good for us on both sides. We know how harmful stress can be. But what we don’t often talk about in the West so much is yeah, I shouldn’t get stressed, but we don’t talk about the astonishing power of relaxation on us. And that’s for healing yes. And that’s what things like chi kung are about. They’re about the healing power of relaxation and, you know, switching the nervous system and just everything that relaxation does. But relaxation has this massive effect in our lives full stop. So I relax and people around me relax. It’s almost as simply as that. And that’s kind of what was happening for you. You went fuck it. You relaxed. The kids relaxed. Oh, my God they’re behaving better.

Rachel Morris

Yeah, who’d have thought?

John C. Parkin

It was a magic trick.

Rachel Morris

Yeah. Yeah, and that all adds up as well with, you know, if you just look at physiologically what happens when we’re stressed. We have high circulating cortisol and we’re in this heightened flight or freeze response the whole time, with all this adrenaline going round our, around our body, and all our thinking comes very black and white and it’s very, very difficult to be creative in that zone. And I guess my observation is what we tend to do in the West and I’m just maybe speaking for myself here is that in order to relax, we go to their unhealthy relaxation type things. So, for example, gin and wine, for example. So, you know, you get to the fridge after a hard day and just pour yourself a very large glass of wine or we sort of pursue leisure maybe. Doing lots of competitive sports or setting us targets to run a marathon and all that sort of thing, which is great, but maybe not relaxing.

John C. Parkin

You’re absolutely right. I mean, the almost all the things we go to for relaxation aren’t particularly good for us.

John C. Parkin

You know we used to after work go into a smoky pub, drink lots and probably smoke. That was the way to relax, but it would have been  – now ah yes, people still drink, drugs, overeating, sugary things, fancy things. That’s what we do to feel better. And that’s what we do to relax. So once we’ve recognised the astonishing power of relaxation, both physiologically and in this, in the more grey area of how it works in our lives. And I love your example because it shows the effect of relaxation and other people.

Rachel Morris

Yeah.

John C. Parkin

And that’s beautiful. And that can happen in a macro scale within our lines. Whereas if we relax more, the whole of life starts to work better. The whole of our lives start to work better. How does that work? Well, we could have a long discussion about that, but it seems to work. So, yeah, relaxation has massive effects physiologically in our lives.

Rachel Morris

And I can certainly see that as a GP and a doctor, if you are relaxed with your patients, you’re going to get much better communication with them. Probably better decision making. You’ll be getting on with your colleagues much better, but it’s really hard to do in a really high pressure environment where you’re absolutely overwhelmed with workload where actually things, things do matter it would be quite hard saying fuck it when you’ve got, like, four urgent abnormal blood results that you’ve got to deal with. So how can someone use this principle in that sort of context?

John C. Parkin

Interestingly enough this week I’ve been working really hard, and I’ve actually used the expression a couple of times. I’m working like Junior Doctor.

Rachel Morris

Or a GP? You can now use the phrase I’m working like a flipping GP.

John C. Parkin

Again? Yeah. Yeah. OK. So I’ve been working like a GP this week, though certainly not the responsibility like there. But it matters what I’ve been doing this week. I’ve been doing this launch around something we’re doing. And if it works, lots of people are gonna be helped in various ways, mainly psychologically. So, yeah, a whole life stuff matters in our lives. So this is a really good question. When people say, well can I say fuck it to anything. Clearly, we’re not talking about saying fuck it to those really important things. And for a lot of people, that would be well, for the wellbeing of my children. My children, you know, helping my children with their homework or yes, to patients and their wellbeing. So what? What fuck it is, it’s a beautiful, beautiful expression because it’s just a tool to take us in the direction that we decide. So, given that my background is a lot around the daoism, daoism really, you know, the idea of daoism is that you follow the natural way. That you see where something is going and you kind of follow it. Doesn’t mean the natural way as in being, you know, whatever, not wearing animal, whatever skins or eating and being vegetarian. But just seeing where things are, you know, seeing the night and day of things. And also that’s where the ideas of yin and yang come from. So so fuck it, you could say fuck it can actually go both ways. If you’re talking about yin, which is a kind of slower energy, and yang the active energy. So fuck it can be, fuck this. I’m gonna do less. I’m gonna give up. I’m not going to care as much. I’m gonna hang around more, you know, downsize, cut my salary, it’s too much. This is too strong and I have to do something about it. That’s the kind of giving up, slowing down, cutting things down the side of it, the yin side of fuck it. And we can talk about that in a second. But there’s also the other side of it, which is fuck it, this is really important to me. I need to prioritise this above everything else. I need to work GPs hours. I need to make sure this happens. So there’s both sides of it. So the critical thing is seeing with perspective, what’s going on. So it’s always gonna be really important to me, my patient’s welfare or my children’s welfare. However, I am killing myself with the hours and the stress and the responsibility. So how can I use whatever tools it is, or whatever tools they are – in this case fuck it. How can I use fuck it to improve things? What do I have to say fuck it to in order to improve things for me? Whether it’s to get a better balance, or to focus, it might say, fuck it I can’t have. I don’t know what it would be. But it might be fuck it, I just can’t have, I can’t continue with that hobby. You know I can’t sustain this personal relationship because I am, it’s so important to me to have this work. So fuck it is like, in a way, it’s coaching on steroids and it’s self coaching on steroids. And I mean the steroids bit there. I don’t just mean the anti inflammatory bit, I mean, I’m talking about the body builders.

Rachel Morris

Yeah yeah – and the bullet coaching?

John C. Parkin

Yes, exactly. Yes.

Rachel Morris

Yeah. So just thinking of to say I’m working really hard. These things really do matter. But there’s this other thing as well, and fuck it, I can’t do that as well. My attention is here in the moment and –

John C. Parkin

That’s right.

Rachel Morris

Okay, so it enables you to choose –

John C. Parkin

Rachel it could be look, this is I’m working too hard and my hours are too long. It’s actually not doing me any good. I have to find a new solution. I have to find a way around this. And then along the way there’s gonna be various fuck its. Maybe, so for example, I’ll just give you a little example of this, which is – it’s likely that GPs have got at least part of the, there’s an archetype or an adaptive type in a particular type of psychology that my wife is a therapist in. There are five adaptive times that we develop, the developmental phase, and one  is called the helper or should helper. These are people, it’s those of us who’re very good at helping others; spend our lives helping others, and it can be rooted in this. It is an adaptive behaviour, and it’s often hard for people who are very good at helping others to ask for help themselves. So the healing and the therapeutic journey for people who are significantly the helper, their learning is, or their journey is to learn how to ask for help from other people. So somebody – I’m imagining a GP now then – massively overworked, overloaded and stressed. And they know that they’re working too hard and the stress is too much. So it could be fuck it I need to ask for help. I need to do something about this. Yeah?

Rachel Morris

Yeah, that makes sense. It’s a fuck it I don’t actually care what other people think of me now I’m gonna ask for this or ask for that.

John C. Parkin

Yeah.

Rachel Morris

So it’s getting rid of the meaning that you’re associating with appearing incredibly successful.

John C. Parkin

That’s right.

Rachel Morris

Or accumulating more and more money.

John C. Parkin

Yes.

Rachel Morris

Okay. Which then helps you make good choices. It helps you then make the choice about actually, what do I want to be doing? You know, what am I not doing because something’s holding me back. In that case, it might be asking for help or even asking for your colleagues to help you out on a GT day when you’ve got too many visits and calls. We’re so attached to other people not thinking badly of us and not thinking that we’re not pulling our weight. If we could just say, oh fuck it, I need help.

John C. Parkin

Yeah. The risk is you say, to what are you risking? What do we think we’re risking when we ask for help? Well, we we’re likely to think that we risk – from childhood it’s not being loved, because when we did ask for help, when we wanted help when we were kids, we weren’t given it. And so we thought the only way that we could be loved was to look after ourselves and then we started helping other people because that was a way that we were valued. So for somebody who’s used to helping and giving the help all the time, it can feel extremely risky. To ask for help. And so, the risk is that people will take their appreciation away. They will take their love away. And in this case they, yes, as you say they might take their respect away. Is that all? God, do they think I can’t cope here? So it could be an extremely risky thing to move from our habitual behaviours. But, and that’s like the main thing here is to develop, which is why the , what did you say, anabolic coaching, the kind of self-coaching on here is I just need to look at this stuff. What’s going on here? What am I doing that’s habitual, that’s causing me pain? That’s making me so stressed. What here can I change? Why don’t I want to change it? Why don’t I want to change my hours? Why don’t l? Why can’t I change my hours? Why can’t I ask for help? And then we’re likely to see that there are gonna be psychological patterns in there, but just by realising, just by understanding, they can start to change.

Rachel Morris

Yeah, that’s really interesting. It’s just I think one of the main things that holds us back from being up say, fuck it, I’ll just do this or I won’t do this, is the fear of what other people are gonna think of us.

John C. Parkin

Absolutely. And it’s, you know, amongst the general population. So we get a massive mix of people who’ve been to our retreats over the last 15-16 years. The most common thing that people want to say fuck it to is that thing about what other people think. The fear of what other people think. It’s the fear of judgement. You know of what we’re expected to do and what we should do. And we’re going to get that as well a lot from our parents, because the expectations of them and from people around it. So saying fuck it to what other people think of me. I mean, in the end, there’s clearly gonna be value. There is gonna be value amongst the noise. Let’s call the outside opinion of me and the view of me as a massive noise, there is gonna be some value in there. There are people in the world when they see me doing certain things and quietly take me aside and say, I know fuck it is your thing John, but I don’t know whether you really should be doing that. I’m going to listen. Sometimes I don’t listen, but I’m going to listen. But generally speaking, and this is, I mean a lot of the work we do Gaia teaches, my wife teaches under this kind of umbrella of fuck it be you. And a lot of what we do is about going back and listening to ourselves. And it’s not that we should listen just to ourselves. But we’re under this weird idea and we’re brought up with the idea that as kids, we should always listen to other people. We should always defer to the adult, to the teacher, to the authority, and that in whatever area it is we’re always having to listen to them. So that’s in the interest of the parents of the teachers of the system that we’re in now is actually within the interests of the system of the existing as adults, that we listen to the government and the police and you know we listen to the authority and we listen to the doctor. Of course, it’s important that we listen to people that are out there as authorities. The problem is it’s gone too far and that we listen almost solely to everybody outside and we don’t listen enough inside. So again, it’s a little bit on the right brain left brain thing. We need to rebalance a bit by listening more to ourselves. What’s right for me? What’s important for me? What do I want to do? You know, forgetting about the ideas of you know my career and my pension and my, you know, the kind of house or car I want. Forgetting about what I should look like. And you know what kind of body I should have and forgetting about what clothes I should wear, what status you should have. Forgetting about what qualifications. Forgetting about what my dad wanted me to be, what my mom wanted me to be, forgetting – and on and on and on. Forgetting about that for a second. What’s right for me and what do I want? And in the end, what relaxes me.  And being me relaxes me by the way, being me relaxes me. Being myself relaxes me because when I’m myself, the energy flows, so it’s a kind of truth thing. When we tell the truth, we’re stronger.

Rachel Morris

That’s interesting. One of the kitchen questions that I like to ask people, which may unlock this for people as well is, what advice would you give to someone else in the same situation?

John C. Parkin

Yes.

Rachel Morris

And quite often the advice is – I’d tell them to fuck it.

John C. Parkin

Yeah. Brilliant.

Rachel Morris

So if you could just ask yourself that question, what would I say? You know, someone, in an identical situation, what advice would I give them? I think the thing that strikes me is that actually a lot of us we’ve been on the treadmill for so long, we’re working so hard, that finding that time to step back and think, what do I want is really hard. And secondly, actually, a lot of us don’t know what relaxes me.

John C. Parkin

No, that’s true. So well, the first thing about time, when we finally do realise that it’s the most important thing we can do is give time to ourselves more. Look after ourselves more, especially if we’re helping others. The realisation that my, you know, my wellbeing – physical and psychological -is critical to my being able to help others. Then we’re more like to put aside time to work with ourselves and look at things and see it is massively valuable to the rest of our lives to be able to work with ourselves. And there was a second part to what you said is the problem. What? What was it?

Rachel Morris

We don’t actually know what relaxes us.

John C. Parkin

Yeah, you’re right there. It’s strange. And that takes conscious relaxation, which is, you know, a lot of people only really deeply relax when they sleep. And, well, as you probably know and many GPs know, a lot of people don’t really sleep very well. But for a proportion of the population, the only time they really relax is when they’re asleep. So to find conscious ways to relax, so that’s not just consciously having a glass of wine, but relaxing without those aides is astonishing. And again, it’s about I said the word conscious, it’s about consciousness. And it may be a guide, you know whatever, or a meditation teacher or an anabolic coach can help. But it’s becoming more conscious. When do I feel most relaxed? What allows me to relax? I mean my process for teaching – I’ve taught relaxation since I was about 22 to various people. Well, the original relaxation techniques, you must know this Rachel, about the, how it was done is basically copy what people are like when they’re relaxed. That’s how it developed when they were first starting to do this kind of thing in the 1950s. They basically study people who were deeply relaxed and see what symptoms they were exhibiting and see what they said about their state of relaxation. And then they’d go to stressed people and say OK, do this. Imagine that your limbs are feeling heavy imagining your forehead is warm, but you’re that you’re feeling warmer. You know that you’re feeling some tingling in your hands and that your body is heavy because that’s what the relax people were feeling. They give that to stressed people and they suddenly start to feel more relaxed. So that’s a kind of fake it until you’re make it form of relaxation. So that kind of works as a standard thing but the way to do it, really, for individuals is to understand what they exhibit when they’re relaxed. What uniquely am I like when I’m relaxed, and if all of us can figure that out through, you know, sitting there, working it out and relaxing and pondering it for a while, then we have our bespoke relaxation method. So I’ll give an example. I know that when I’m really relaxed, I’ve become very sensitive to sound and I start to love sound. So you know, if I’m really, really relaxed, I adore the sound of the lorry going past on the road. I adore the sound of somebody else in the block of apartments flushing the toilet, totally adore it. Makes me feel even more relaxed. So if I’m stressed, I know that one thing I can do to relax myself really quickly is just tune into the sounds. And on cue, a car goes past outside the flats now.

Rachel Morris

Yeah, that’s interesting it does. I was actually just before we came on the podcast. I was doing a headspace meditation. I’m a big fan of head space. Actually, I’ve just started using it, and it was beating stress meditation and you sort of picture yourself being filled with sort of liquid sunshine or whatever. I mean a really simple thing, but actually it’s really helpful. Then you can sort of flash that exercise, and I know there’s people who between patients have develop little rituals. And Catherine Hickman, who was on the podcast earlier, was talking about a squeegee breath where she said it has a way of exhaling the previous patient and inhaling something or other. You know, I can’t remember exactly what it was, but it was something that she does just to tune into herself because I think it’s really difficult to make these decisions, or have these fuck it moments while we’re in the middle of the stress. And I think that’s maybe when we end up saying fuck it to the wrong things.

John C. Parkin

Sometimes I’m grateful for the times when the stress has been so great that there’s been almost nothing else to do but say fuck it.

Rachel Morris

Right, okay, yeah.

John C. Parkin

And that’s when I talk about stress and teach about beating, sorting stress. My Mikey point is, let’s thank stress for what it is. We don’t want stress not to be there because stress is a great gift to us. If we’re willing to listen to it.

Rachel Morris

Right, yeah.

John C. Parkin

Stress is a great indicator that something’s not really working.

Rachel Morris

Yeah.

John C. Parkin

Something’s wrong. I mean, in it’s pure court case. It’s an indication of emergency, a huge stress response that we have in an emergency where we mobilise the adrenaline and cortisol etc. It’s there to react to a thing, but generally speaking, stress is a sign that there’s something wrong and if we listen to it and in the end try to reduce that stress – and I agree things like Headspace are wonderful. And it’s good to meditate, it’s good to do Tai Chi, it’s good to do Yoga, it’s good to sit around and drink tea, but we should also think about the source and about response and wondering whether we should be doing something about it.  Now we may think that that’s fine. It’s fine. I’m OK with this stress there’s the kind of e stress idea, that you know  stress, the stimulation of stress is good for me. It can be good for me physically in certain ways. But generally speaking, for most of us, the stress is not the e stress. It’s the booze stress. It doesn’t do us any good as all your GPs know.

Rachel Morris

I think the problem is, though, that a lot of us feel that to be stressed is normal. Now it’s just to work as,  to be working as a doctor or lawyer now is to be permanently stressed. And yeah, you know, I’m I get really cross with this whole busyness idea that we sort of wear that like a badge of honour. But, you know, it is not a normal physiological state, which is why we’re suffering so to use it as a warning light I like that’s an emergency is a sign that there’s something wrong. Yeah, but then I guess it’s making the decisions while we’re in the relaxed frame of mind that I know I’m someone that will throw the entire baby out with the bath water.

John C. Parkin

Yeah.

Rachel Morris

If I’m not careful. So don’t do things while you’re in your fight flight or freeze zone because you’re likely to possibly make the wrong decision.

John C. Parkin

I’ll say I agree that, I agree with that. And we always say on our retreat, to you know, don’t go back home and resign from your job. Give it at least a few days to think before. And in that case, they’re not, they’re not acting from the fight flight freeze, they’re acting from the sudden, massive perspective –

Rachel Morris

Yeah.

John C. Parkin

– over their lives. But then, when they get to reality, they don’t have to get that balance right again. I mean, it’s the kind I’ve always seen. For example, my illness. I’ve always seen as a, as the canary in the mine, and I think those of us with some form of chronic illness can regard ourselves as relatively fortunate because you know we’re quite sensitive souls, so it doesn’t take that much of, you know, sleepless nights or stress or extreme worry to start affecting my health. And so I tend. I’m touching. I dunno, I don’t know what to touch here as I say this. I’m don’t know, I’m gonna say it anyway. I tend to probably live a more healthy life than I otherwise would because I’m somewhat sensitive. And that’s a good thing. So if we can see that these are warning lights and that whatever it is that effects is the most when we’re stressed, that is the canary in our mind. The canary. It’s just dropped to the bottom of the cage.

Rachel Morris

Yes.

John C. Parkin

Okay, this is a warning. Let’s not – I don’t want to let myself drop to the bottom of the cage.

Rachel Morris

Yeah. Yeah. So what tips would you have for people that are experiencing a lot of stress that have so much on in their lives and they’re thinking I have no idea what I, I would love to say fuck it to everything, But I can’t. What advice would you have for them?

John C. Parkin

Well, the recognition that things aren’t right, they know there’s an interesting situation here for all of us. And it’s for very few people, is it as everything in balance and perfectly right. So it’s a constant journey of discovery and self discovery, and I see the process of self coaching self analysis as almost like a detective. So I see my life both in the present and by what I’ve experienced in the past. I see it like a detective with a case. So that is an interesting situation. Seen from the outside. Here I am as somebody as a helper. Not looking after myself, running too hard, working too hard, stressing too much. How interesting. So first of all, to try and get a bit of perspective about it, like in meditation to look at it from the outside and then start to pick it apart. Okay, so what’s happening here? Why have I got to this? Is it a necessary part of the job? Are there things I can do? Is the habitual behaviour in me that’s based on some form of psychological pattern that I can work with to change. Do I need to talk to somebody a coach or a therapist about this? Do I need help within the practise myself. What am I doing differently? What can I do differently with my patients that would change the relationship and the experience for them and for me if I relax 50%. But what would that mean in my life if I did, you know, yoga twice a week. So I think the main thing is suddenly recognising the importance of this. It’s lovely what you said about the fact that we all see it as normal now for GPs and lawyers and professionals to kind of go well, the stress and the overwork is normal. Well, it shouldn’t be normal. We all know that. And doctors should really know more than anyone else really. Because they know more than anybody else the effects of stress on the system in the body and that a lot of illness arises from these causes. So it’s about, for me, the biggest tip is it’s time to take it seriously. Step back, have a look and then you can use amongst other things fuck it to help you care less about what others think or about what the value of this, or about helping to change something. To let go of something or go for something. So fuck it allows movement basically. We’re after – is that you mentioned on the freeze, the freeze response and it is, you know, there’s a general under stress. There’s a general freeze response, psychologically really. So what we’re after is movement, and the movement starts by looking at it and going OK, where do I need to move here? What needs to happen here? To allow the movement to happen. And doing that – and you pointed this out as well – doing that from a relaxed space, rather than a stress space is pretty important.

Rachel Morris

Yes. Yeah, yeah. So it’s the real mindset shift, isn’t it? Fuck it. It just allows you to then move to know what you need to do and to remove the blockers and the barriers that are stopping you doing that. That’s what you’re saying. Fuck it too. It’s the barriers, isn’t it?

John C. Parkin

That’s right.

Rachel Morris

It’s the blockers in your mind.

John C. Parkin

Yeah exactly.

Rachel Morris

Brilliant. But, John, thank you so much. There was just so much stuff in there that is really, really helpful personally to me, and I’m sure will be helpful to lots of other people. If people wanted to find out more, how could they find out more about your work? Join in with what you’re doing? Etc. Etc.

John C. Parkin

Sure. Well simple thing really is to Google fuck it and after you get past one of the songs, you’ll start to see bits about us. So we have a website, which is the fuck it life. We’re on Facebook. We have a lot of followers on Facebook and the best way to do it really, to stay in touch with what we do is to join up with us on our site. So we have a how fuck it are you quiz people which can do and then sign up and then they get stuff from us. But of course, read one of the books. We have my original book, which is still the one that that’s that sells more than the others. It’s called Fuck it the ultimate spiritual way, which is about the idea that fuck it can be this therapeutic and actually spiritually thing. As I’ve said we’ve written other ones. I’ve written fuck it do what you love, which is about understanding what we like and then going and doing it. Fuck it therapy, which is more the therapeutic side and the most recent one I wrote was pretty much a mantra in the title, which is fuck it, be at peace with life, just as it is. And that’s about accepting things just as it is, just as they are.

Rachel Morris

Wow.

John C. Parkin

So yeah –

Rachel Morris

Brilliant.

John C. Parkin

That’s the fuck it world.

Rachel Morris

Brilliant. Well we’ll put all those links in the show notes so people can – people can just click straight through. There’s so much more I want to ask you. So will you come back on the podcast another time?

John C. Parkin

I’d love to, that’d be great thank you Rachel. And it’s been lovely to talk.

Rachel Morris

Brilliant thanks then John. Bye.

Rachel Morris

Thanks for listening. If you’ve enjoyed this episode then please do subscribe to the podcast and also please rate it on iTunes so that other people can find it too. Do follow me on Twitter at Dr. Rachel Morris, and you can find out more about the face to face and online courses which I run on the youarenotafrog.co.uk website. Bye for now.

Episode 20 – A creative solution to stress with Ruth Cocksedge

In this episode, Rachel is joined by Ruth Cocksedge a Practitioner Psychologist who started her career as a mental health nurse. She practices in Cambridge and has a particular interest in EMDR for PTSD and creative writing as a way to improve mental health and wellbeing.

Episode 11 – The magical art of reading sweary books

In this episode, Rachel is joined once again by Dr Liz O’Riordan, the ‘Breast Surgeon with Breast Cancer’, TEDx speaker, author, blogger, triathlete and all round superstar who has been nominated for ‘Woman of the Year’.

Previous Podcasts.

Ways to stay in touch.

Join the community

Fill in just a few details to hear about the latest tools, services and resources designed to help GPs and others members of the Primary Care team become more resourceful and resilient in the workplace.

@ Copyright 2019 Wild Monday Resilience Ltd (Reg no 11673722)

2020-01-03T16:44:58+00:00