Episode 16: Productivity hacks for a calm and effective life, with Dr Gandalf

In this episode, Rachel is joined by Dr Hussain Ghandi aka Dr Gandalf, GP, PCN Director, creator of eGPLearning  and host of the popular eGPLearning Podblast.

We chat about how to be more efficient and effective by making those tiny, incremental changes which, when added up will save us a whole heap of time. We delve into Ghandi’s daily routine to find out how he can fit so much in and discuss simple productivity hacks that GPs, doctors and people in other busy jobs can use – no tech needed!

Ghandi shares his top 3 tips for GPs: Do the biggest and most unpleasant tasks first, batch up your tasks so that you do the same things at the same time and – the quickest and easiest to do – turn off your notifications! This helps you to avoid the trap of multitasking (or attention diversion as it’s otherwise known).

Put all your transcript content in here.

Podcast links

Podcast links

https://egplearning.co.uk

Dr Rachel Morris video interview about resilience on the eGPLearning podblast

Follow Ghandi on twitter @drgandalf52 @egplearning

https://hbr.org/2019/11/how-remote-workers-make-work-friends

https://calendly.com

https://todo.microsoft.com/tasks/

Ike to do app

The Miracle Morning: The 6 habits that will transform your life before 8am book

Sign up for downloadable CPD reflection forms plus more tools and resources

For more episodes of You are not a frog, check out our website www.youarenotafrog.co.uk and sign up to our mailing list here for loads of useful resources about thriving at work.

Follow Rachel on twitter @DrRachelMorris or LinkedIn and find out more about her online and face to face courses for doctors on surviving and thriving at work at www.shapesfordoctors.com or for other organisations at www.wildmonday.co.uk

Podcast transcript

Welcome to episode 16 of You Are Not a Frog: Productivity Hacks for a calm and effective life.

Dr Rachel Morris

Welcome to you are not a frog, the podcast for GPs, hospital doctors and other busy people in high stress jobs. Working in today’s high stress environment, you may feel like a frog in boiling water. Things have heated up so slowly that you might not have noticed the extra long days becoming the norm. You’ve got used to feeling constantly busy and are often one crisis away from not coping. Let’s face it, frogs only have two choices: to stay in the pan and get boiled alive, or to hop out and leave. But you are not a frog, and that’s where this podcast comes in. You have many more choices than you think you do. There are simple changes that you can make, which will make a huge difference to your stress levels and help you enjoy life again. I’m your host Dr Rachel Morris, GPs and executive coach and specialist in resilience at work. I’ll be talking to friends, colleagues, and experts, all who have an interesting take on this so that together we can take back control to survive and really thrive in our work and lives.

Dr Rachel Morris

I’d like to tell you about our new CPD forms. If you want to learn while you listen and claim CPD points, then go to the link in the show notes and sign up to receive our fully downloadable podcast CPD forms. Each one is populated with show notes and links so that you could listen, reflect, and then note down what you’re going to do. A quick, easy and enjoyable way to do your CPD.

Dr Rachel Morris

Before we get into the podcast, I thought I’d let you know a little bit about what I’ve been up to. So I’ve been working with loads of training hub CEPNs  and LMCs to provide training for resilience and retention for GPs, practice managers and other members of the primary healthcare team. So if you work in a training hub or are looking for some practical and effective training to help you beat stress, increase your resilience and productivity, then please get in touch. And we know that connection with others is so, so important, so we also can train GPs to facilitate and run peer groups for support in their area. Again, get in touch with me if you’d like to know more about this.

Dr Rachel Morris

As well as helping you to increase your well being and to beat stress, my shapes talk it training also helps people take control of their work and be more productive. So it was really great to talk to Dr Gandalf for this episode of the podcast. Now he’s looked deeply into productivity and all the various tech hacks that we can do to help us save just that little bit extra of time. He’s got some really good ideas and principles that I think, if we all followed, would make our lives that little bit easier. I hope you enjoy this podcast.

Dr Rachel Morris

So it’s really great to have with me on the podcast today Gandhi, aka Dr Gandalf., and I’m sure lots of you will have seen him on Twitter, on Facebook, on various different social media channels. He’s the host of the very popular EGP Learning podcast, and I was on that recently, and it was really great to chat with him. So I thought it would be great to here about the hacks that he uses personally in his life because he does a lot of stuff around GP resilience. So welcome Ghandi, great to have you here.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Thank you for having me Rachel. It’s been great.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah. So what I wanted to start off with was asking you what your daily routine is? Because I know when I’ve spoken to you before about all the many, many roles that you have. So you’re a PCN director, you’re GP, you run your website, your podcasts, all that sort of stuff. How do you fit it all in? And I know you’ve said to me in the past, I don’t sleep. I don’t believe that. Cos I don’t reckon anyone could be as productive as you are with no sleep. So how do you fit in? And what is it you do? What’s your sort of normal daily routine?

Dr Hussain Ghandi

So my normal daily routine is I normally get up just before six o’clock and then I spend a good half hour an hour or so, depending on how alert I am at that point, just cracking on with stuff. So I do a lot of the tinkering for my website or I do little bit emailing for my PCN work and that kind of stuff. And I do that pretty much as soon as I get up. So I kind of read the whole miracle morning thing by Hal Elrod eight months ago. Yeah, miracle morning and kind of thought you know what? There may be something here, so let’s give it a try. And actually, at that time I was fasting. So I was waking up at the crack of dawn, which was, you know, to start the fasten things with about four o’clock in the morning.

Dr Rachel Morris

Oh my word.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

At that point, you know, I was getting up anyway, so I thought, let’s give this a try, let’s see how productive I can actually be. And then when Ramadan finished, I just continued doing it for a while and it worked really, really well actually, I got tonnes done. And then the summer holidays hit and kind of lopped a little bit with it, because kids being kids, sometimes my son would wake up at six in the morning as well with me, which was a bit more challenging, trying to do things with him sitting in the room. But actually it’s something I try to maintain and most of the days of the week now I still do that. So I do a little bit of exercise to get the morning going, I drink a couple glasses of water, like, you know, they mentioned in that kind of book and stuff and then crack on with work really.

Dr Rachel Morris

Right.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

So that’s one of reasons why I tend to do quite a lot of stuff because I do kind of sign up for this whole thing that first thing in the morning you’re probably most rested, so if you are the type of person that can actually wake yourself up at that time, if you can get cracking, you can actually get a lot of stuff done. I do find that I’m a lot more productive. So if I’ve got the chunk of work I need to do, and I know it’s gonna take me about 40 minutes or so, I know I can get it sorted in that time. So whether it’s looking at PCN documents, whether it’s, you know, editing an episode of the podcast or all that kind of stuff, you know, I can do that quickly and effectively.  Seven o’clock my son normally wakes up, and I sit down with him for a bit before work and things, and we kind of go through a couple of bits and stuff. So he’s trying to learn kind of his study stuff and things. And you know we sit down and do that and I make him breakfast and then I head off to work and stuff. And then my normal working day in terms of clinical stuff kicks off really. And then I come home and chill out a bit and sometimes do work on top of that. May or may not be great, depending on how much I’ve got going on. Like you said, because I’ve got so many different hats, it’s got this annoying habit of going through feast or famine. So there’s no work to do for ages, and all of a sudden you got tonnes to do alone. And low and behold, it’s the exact same time that one of your other roles has tonnes to do. So it’s just trying to stagger that, that’s been probably one of my best hacks of trying to make sure that I’m actually not getting into problems with that in terms of doing that, the big thing for me lately has been to do apps. I’ve been spending a bit of time trying to find one that works for me so that I know what I need to do kind of thing and that’s starting to work a lot more effectively.

Dr Rachel Morris

That’s interesting – the to do apps – because I’ve been looking for to do apps that work for me and what I realised that actually, my problem is not the apps, it’s actually reviewing my lists regularly. So I’ve been keeping a to do list on evernote and it’s probably got 200 things on it, and I never look at it.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

So one of things I find is when you create a to do list, loads of people are really good at creating lists.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yes.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

That they can do. Like you say, it’s the review thing. But then remembering to review it is part of the challenge as well. So one of things I found is with ones that I use, I love the remind me function. So quite a few of them have functions where you could set a timer.

Dr Rachel Morris

Okay.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

So you got, normally a due date and you’ve got an alarm that you can set as well. And what I would normally do, I’d have the due date for whenever the task has to be done by and then I always set the alarm to remind me, depending on what the task is, a set time before that – in line with what I know I would normally be doing. So for example, my PCN work, I tend to do most of it on a Friday because that’s the day I have allocated for it. So I will make sure that if it’s a task that needs doing, say, by the Monday after the Friday. Well I’ve got the due date done but I’ll set the reminder to go off first thing Friday morning that says, actually, you need to make sure you’ve done this today and that helps me because I see – the first thing I see then when I look at my phone or my computer, when I go onto it, is like ping you’ve got a reminder. You have to do this and right that’s what I need to focus on. That’s why I need to do today.

Dr Rachel Morris

And do you find that you have a bit of a routine about okay it’s PCN work on a Thursday and it’s maybe podcast on a Wednesday, which is Wednesday when we’re recording this, does that help you? Or does it tends to be a bit all over the place?

Dr Hussain Ghandi

It does. I think one of the challenges many GPs have is that we’re really good at doing stuff, really bad at saying no.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Generally speaking, and as a result to that we find ways to expand our times. I think it’s Parkinson’s law if I remember rightly, any task will fill the amount of time you allocate for it. And, you know, we see that in consultations, for example. So you know, people talk about how long consultation should be, whether it’s 10 mins, 15 minutes, etc. But no matter how much time you allocate for the consultation, it will naturally fill that amount of time you’ve got allocated and often you need a few more minutes extra anyway because there’s other agendas that come into play, and it’s exactly the same with any kind of task. And you know, one the best examples I’ve seen for that is, when people have a deadline, you know, say for example you’ve only got three weeks to write an essay, it doesn’t take you three weeks to write an essay, majority of people would churn it out in the last couple of days. So actually, the task is still taking you three weeks because you have not dealt with it, because you’ve not had the time pressure, you’ve not had the motivation to do it. But if you actually make sure you got the right amount time allocated for that task then you get it done a lot more effectively.

Dr Rachel Morris

That’s interesting about deadlines, because I read this about deadlines that you should, you know, almost give yourself artificial deadlines, which means that you do things in time. You block out your time  in the diary to do it. But I seem to find that doesn’t really work with me. I almost need that pressure of when it has to be to do it. And even if I set myself the artificial deadlines… do you think that’s true for everyone? Or just for depending on your personality type or what you’re like?

Dr Hussain Ghandi

I think there’s definitely personality type, so there are going to be people out there that you know they have three weeks to do to do something, and they’ll have it done on day one. There are definitely those kind of people there, and there are a lot more people I think that are out there, that you have three weeks to do something and they’ll be doing it 10 minutes before due.  You know that’s human psychology and that’s human nature. But I think when you try and set yourself a deadline, you have to, I think give yourself a reason why that deadline is important by creating an artificial deadline. Why is that one important and more important than the actual deadline of the task. So if I have those kind of things, I will actually put on my deadline, you know, for example, I’ve set it for Friday morning because you got X, X and X to do next week. You know that kind of – so link it off to the other task to remind me actually, I have to do it now because next week I’ve got this to do, and I need to make sure that’s done, so make sure everything’s sorted.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

You mentioned about having allocated time. So my podcast like, I typically record or do most of the stuff for that on Wednesday morning. Now, if I don’t have the allocated time, I don’t get it done. That’s the thing if I find it much more challenging. So making sure I’ve given myself space and time to do these kind of things – and to go back to my earlier point because GPs are generally quite bad at saying no what we find is that they take on lots of extra stuff, and then the time pressure just crashes onto them. So making sure that if you are particularly having multiple roles multiple hats, as I like to call it that you are allocating time in your week to do it. Otherwise, what happens is you prioritise everything for the things that you feel are important or probably are important. So, for example, patient facing that kind of thing. But then all this extra stuff that actually makes your brain tick often in a different way. You then find that you’re pressuring yourself to get those done. And then you may lose the joy of doing those kind of things which actually also bring you a lot of satisfaction, a lot of fulfilment and that kind of thing. And that’s where burn out unfortunately becomes more of a challenge.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, yes, I’ve noticed that definitely the urgent stuff always crowds out the important stuff, and I guess it’s the urgent important stuff that crowds out the important stuff, and it’s trying to find some time that you can set aside where you will do the importance stuff. For example, yesterday I had a really big project to do. It wasn’t urgent, urgent, but I needed to do it but there were about 10 really urgent things that I needed to do and it was really difficult to get the discipline to say I’m not going to do those urgent things. I’m going to focus on this big, important things, otherwise that’s going to become urgent.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

I guess the challenging thing is trying to allocate, like you said the urgency versus importance. One thing I love for that is the Eisenhower matrix.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

I’m sure you’ve come across this, and if people are looking for a tech way of doing this, there’s really good app that does this.

Dr Rachel Morris

Ooh what’s that?

Dr Hussain Ghandi

It’s the one I’ve been using for myself for quite a while up until recently, and I’ll explain why in a second. But it’s called Ike – I k e. I think it’s only Android unfortunately, it’s not Apple based. I know this is a slight frustration, but it is awesome, and the reason why it’s awesome is whenever you put yourself a task, it actually forces you to use it in the form of an Eisenhower matrix. So for those people that haven’t heard about this Eisenhower matrix is basically a grid, four way grid, of urgency versus importance. So you got your urgent important, your urgent not important, you’re not urgent important, and you’re not urgent not important. And effectively, it forces you every time you have the task to choose which of those four quadrants you’re putting that task into. And you could rename them if you want, so you can have them as, you know, focus, plans, future work, that kind of stuff and the idea being because you’re being forced to put it into that category. It just helps you have that little step of okay, where’s it going? How am I gonna allocate this? There’s still the trick of trying to analyse that yourself and what you tend to find then is that by using a matrix like this it forces you to decide, because then if you put everything into the urgent important you’re going to have have loads in there. And then when you see the kind of app when you open it up, it says well you got 30 things in your urgent and important, and nothing in your not urgent, not important. And then the question, is that right? I really like the app for that reason, it’s why I recommend it a lot to people who do struggle with productivity because it just makes you have that decision process of where do I stick this? Then there is out of the question of the whole not urgent, not important category. Are you actually the person that needs to be doing that task and it’s a way of doing those particular task, so you don’t need to? And taking it from there really.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah and we talk to people a lot because I use this the urgent important matrix all the time when I’m doing all these, my training courses for GPs on resilience, and the problem is, they end up with nothing in their not important, not urgent box, everything seems to be important. And then you’ve got some stuff that’s urgent and not important and we talk to people about delegating that – we find it really hard to delegate stuff don’t we?

Dr Hussain Ghandi

We do. And I think that’s partly a control aspect in the fact that GPs like to have control and like to be able to, you know, and because I can probably do this better than anybody else. I think there is an element of that if I’m being honest, but also it is because the responsibility that comes with our roles, you know, there are many people out there that feel this fear,  that if I haven’t, if it’s not done right, it’s going to come back, you know, in effect, bite me in the butt. So making sure that doesn’t happen, the best way to do it is if I do it myself. Actually, if you’re doing everything, where you gonna find the time for doing everything, you know this is the problem. So things have to be delegated, and as long as there is a structure, then it’s fine. As long as you’ve got a principal or process, there’s no point saying, well, I’m not going to do this, so I’m not gonna do it and then leaving it for somebody else to figure out. Yeah you clearly need to have the input and a policy or process to figure out how to do that. For example, pathology results. You know, not every pathology result has to be seen by a doctor. There are quite a few examples I could give you that you don’t really need a doctor’s input into them. So things like smear test for example, INR test results, those kind of things. If you have a process and a policy in place that says okay, if it’s high, this needs to happen, if it’s low, this needs to happen, then actually that will take out some of that workload. And it may seem well, they’re simple things it will only take me a few seconds. It’s not a big problem. Count up how many times you’re having to do that over a day, count up how you haven’t how many times you have to do that over a week over a month. And actually that becomes from seconds, to minutes, to hours. And that’s where you can start to make those simple little gains and the best example of, you know, incremental gains is the sky cycling team. So they talk about this often. They went from basically obscurity to being one of the best cycling teams in the world, and what they did was they looked every little thing that the cyclists were doing from how they were training from how they even sleeping and, you know, kind of the mattresses they would use. And they found that actually making people as comfortable as effective as possible, and even if it shaved a few seconds off, actually, few seconds here, a few seconds there. It builds up into minutes, and that’s how they got their times down so amazingly so. You know, I’ve heard stories about how they carry around their own mattresses that they have at home because they’re more comfortable, more rested and therefore, they can work more effectively. And it’s just those simple principles that incremental gains that you can have can actually lead to a significant massive, you know, improvement. I mean the other term is compound gains, but this, yeah, it’s that kind of principle.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, so it’s interesting, I think, with the delegation piece is really important. But then again, it takes time to delegate. You get back to that non urgent but important quadrant, which I think Stephen Court – Covey – calls quadrant too, doesn’t he in his book Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, which is another really good book to read about productivity and managing yourself. You know and all these things that you can shave seconds off, it takes a while to actually set them up, doesn’t it?

Dr Hussain Ghandi

It can do and I think this is where I think a lot of people really struggle. But what I don’t even have time to get a cup of coffee.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Yeah.  So how on earth can I figure out a  policy or protocol. So how someone else could look at my INR results? Yeah, I completely understand that. And hear that. But then the problem is that means you’re still doing the work. Sometimes it is more important to say, actually I need to find the time to do this, or do I need to get someone else to do this and trust that they’ve done it properly? And that’s the other part, you know? So we have, for example, generally very good administrational and practice management teams. There is this aspect of saying to them, I need you to go off and figure out a better way for us to do this. You know, I will pop back in and see how you’re getting on with what you come up with. I may need to tweak a couple of things from the clinical side of things. But actually, those people are probably better at figuring out systems and processes than GPs are because actually, we don’t look at it from the how does it work or flow system? We just look at what the outcome is in terms of the patient, and that’s important. Do not get me wrong. It’s vitally important. That’s where you need that clinical input. But at the same time, if you don’t have that organisational overview, in a sense, or that analytical view of the how logic works, how it flows in that kind of stuff, you don’t tend to make the same gains. And we’ve seen that, all the people have made significant innovations in primary care, they’ve generally come from people who are not just clinician, but clinicians with that kind of brain that works in terms of looking at logical organisational stuff or administrative teams that run that kind of stuff for them. And that’s why they’re more affective than just having the clinical brain say, this is how we need to work it out because they look at the processes and that may not always be the best thing that us GPs are good at looking at.

Dr Rachel Morris

I’ve heard about a practice recently that’s appointed a business manager who’s come in from a completely other industry and who’s been sort of walking around going, my goodness, this place is run so inefficiently there’s so many little things we could do to make everyone’s lives better. And I think having that outside perspective is really, really helpful.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

And increasingly, there are many practices, particularly medium sized ones, I think have now started to realise that you know, having a for example practice manager is good and effective. Having a business manager that looks at the actual financial side of things and, like you said from potentially a different organisational view than general practice tends to be more financially beneficial, but also in terms of system processes, they bring that learning from other areas that can actually have a better impact in terms of how we work.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, really important. So if we’re thinking about these little things that we could do that could bring us incremental gains, what do you think is the single most time effective thing that GP could do to get them the biggest amount of time back?

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Okay, I think there’s three things I would say to look at, and this is if anybody’s looking at productivity these are the three things I would say that you have to consider at the very least, when you’re looking to try and improve your work flow. So number one is, I like the concept of the three frogs. Probably relevant that we’re on your podcast talking about this. And it’s got various different names and the origins and that kind of stuff. But the way I describe it to people is, imagine if your life depended on you eating three frogs that are sitting in front of you –

Dr Rachel Morris

Right.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

– and you have no choice. If you don’t eat them, you’re going to die ok. Which of those three frogs are you going to choose to be the first one that you take down? I’m gonna ask you, Rachel, which would you go for?

Dr Rachel Morris

You just gotta do it, you gotta do. But yeah, probably the biggest, biggest and the ugliest while I’m still a bit hungry.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Exactly. Yeah, now. And that’s completely true. You go to the biggest, fattest, ugliest one. Because if you’ve got that one down, to be honest, the other two should be a bit easier. You know, because they’re not as big, they’re not as fat, and they’re not as ugly.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Yeah and it’s exactly the same with tasks that we have to do. When you’ve got a variety of things that you have to do in your day in actual fact going for the biggest, hardest one that you think of first, is actually probably the best thing to do. And the reason for doing that – say, for example, you’ve got a complicated patient that you know, has taken a lot of time, and you need to speak to them and in a sense, you’re kind of dreading it. And I know people use various different terms. Things can be hard seeing patients or whatever. I’m not going to go into the terms themselves. But it’s that kind of thing that, you know, it’s gonna take you time or it’s gonna take you effort. If you deal with that first, it’s done. That’s it, it’s out of the way, you don’t have to worry about it yeah. If you leave it till the last thing that you do all the other things that you have done that have chipped away at your psychological well being, your resilience, all that kind of stuff, and then you get into it. How you gonna feel then?

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah it’s hung over you all day.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Yep. And the stress of it being there potentially as well, you know. And this could be anything from patient encounter. This could be writing a report, you know. I know for some people it’s things like complaints that could be one that hangs over people’s heads. I’ve gotta write this complaint, right? Just get on and do it. You know, it’s gonna be unpleasant. You’re not gonna like doing it. But once it’s done, it’s done. And then you don’t have to think about it until the next stage, which could be three weeks away. But actually, the challenge of getting it done is done. So definitely the first thing for me is look at this concept of three frogs or basically pick the hardest thing that you have to do in your day and make that the first thing that you’re doing.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, I was just thinking about a book called The 15 Minute Rule. I don’t know if you’ve read that?

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Not heard that one no.

Dr Rachel Morris

I actually find that, it’s a bit similar to this frog thing and obviously I do like frogs so I prefer the frog concept but hey, spoiler alert, I’m gonna tell you everything in the 15 minute rule book, like in literally 30 seconds. It basically says if you’ve got a really big task to do and you don’t want to do it, put a timer on for 15 minutes and say, I’m going to start it. Because often it’s just starting something that’s the problem and say to yourself, absolutely after 15 minutes, I’m going to stop doing it. So psychologically, you know, you’ve only got 15 minutes of it and then nine times out of 10 once you started it, when you get to 15 minutes, you’re pretty much all of the way through. You think, well, I’ll just finish it. That wasn’t too bad. So it’s just a way of getting over this sort of psychological barrier of actually getting something done and that has been really helpful for me when there’s just a really big thing and think I don’t even know where to go with this. Okay, let’s just start Googling a few things and then suddenly it’s got a lot easier so that’s something as well that I would recommend. So what’s your number two? What’s your number two tip?

Dr Hussain Ghandi

So my number two is definitely batching.

Dr Rachel Morris

Okay.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

So in general practice, we have a variety of different tasks and things that we have to do, you know, when you work, walk into practice. So on a typical GP’s list, I’m guessing will be things like, so there’s obviously patient contact and whatever that may be, whether that’s telephone, face to face or other kind of things. There will be clinical admin that you have to do. So your pathology results, they’ll be your letters that you have to look at. And then it will be your tasks, whatever they’re called. You know, different systems have different names for them that kind of thing. And then they’ll be all the other administrative stuff, like audits and appraisals and all the other kind of things. Batch, what you’re doing. If you do that, it works so much better. And the reason for that is, people talk about this concept called multitasking. Okay, multitasking doesn’t exist.

Dr Rachel Morris

No.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

It’s attention diversion.

Dr Rachel Morris

Ooh yeah.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

That’s how I describe it because in reality, particularly the type of work that we do as clinicians, you can’t multi task, you know, managing two different patients at the same time. That’s dangerous. You can easily make a mistake and get confused. You could have that wrong notes open or you can put put prescription for the wrong patient. So trying to multi task with clinical care is not ideal. Clearly there are situations where it still has to happen and things, for example, like a chaotic E D department, you know resus room, that kind of stuff. That may be the situation you’re in, and it can’t be avoided. In practise, you may be on call and have one patient sitting in your room, another patient on the other side of the practice going into asthma arrests, something like that, you know, respiratory arrests and things. Yeah, fair enough you may have to do that at times, but it should not be the norm. That’s what I’m trying to get at. So making sure that you are batching the work that you’re doing. The other reason for doing that is that when you get into the flow of doing a repetitive task, whether it is something like looking at pathology results, whether it’s looking your clinical letters, it flows so much better when that’s the only task you’re doing. Because your mind is set up for doing it in that format. So if you’re looking your clinical letters, there will be a process you run through. When you look at clinical letters, I look at this part. I’ll look at letter first, for example, I’ll scan for the relevant bits I need to do if I need to change the medications, I can do that. If I need to pass it on someone, I could do that. It’s a set workflow that you have in your brain. And actually that will flow a lot better than you doing five minutes of that and then oh, no, I’ve got some pathology I need to do I’ll go do that, or I’ve got some prescriptions I need to go, I’ll do that and then I’ll come back to my letters. No. Give yourself 20 minutes in the day to say I’m just going to spend 20 minutes on my letter at that one point in the day and that’s it. I’m not gonna touch them now until tomorrow, because actually, there’s no reason to, you know, there shouldn’t be things that come through urgently that say you have to deal with it again till you’re the next time you make that touch point. Unless, of course, you’re not going to be in for a few days. And if they are urgent, there should be a different system that raised that urgency to you, not burying it in the mass kind of thing. So batching is definitely the big thing I say to a lot of people. My particular thing is, I get in the morning, I look at my pathology results in the morning, and I’ll get through those. And I can normally do in about 5-10 minutes or so because actually, we’ve got systems in place to try and reduce them. My letters, I tend not to do until later on in the afternoon because the influx of letters I get is around about 11 o’clock in the morning when you know scanners and stuff have done the morning workload. So then I’m just having to touch it once. I’m not having to go back again multiple times because there’s no point is just taking more of my time away. So batching. Definitely big thing.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah and I’ve heard that if you’re deep in a task and you get interrupted, it takes up to 23 minutes to get back into that same task.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Can do yeah. So, yeah, it definitely can take you time. I think in clinical stuff it’s a bit more challenging because a way that we approach our clinical task is different. But that mindset yeah, definitely different perspective. And I guess another example I’ll give to our listeners – people who have ever done things like sitting wait clinics. You know, where you’ve had a long list of patients you need to just get through, yeah, because there’s the waiting room’s full. You’ve got God knows how many people waiting to see you. Actually, if you focus on just seeing those patients, chances are you’ll get through them a lot quicker, than if you have interruptions coming through. So if you’re happy to be on call and people are interrupting you because this has happened. This has happened. This has happened. That will take you so much more longer because you’re with one person, your being diverted to deal with something else because you’ve had an interruption and then you’re having to go back and it just doesn’t work. So when we did that, one of things we try to do is make sure that if you’re doing the sit and wait clinics, that’s all you did. You weren’t on call. You weren’t doing other things. You know, you were just doing that. Now we’ve moved away from that because we’ve realised sit and wait didn’t really work and we’ve got a different system. But you know, for example, our triage system is now very much that when you’re doing triage that’s all you’re doing. You’re not doing, you’re not on call. We make sure that you know, as best as we can to make sure that never happens and therefore, that means you can just focus on that one task because that’s the important thing. That’s the rate limiting step that you know has to happen. So, actually, if you’re focused on that, you’re not being interrupted with other stuff.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, I think that’s such an important principle and I’ve started trying to do that with things like emails. Batching emails. So rather than just answer emails as they come in and definitely turn off your email notifications because that is absolutely attention –

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Definitely!

Dr Rachel Morris

– attention, killer. So if you take one thing from this podcast, turn off those little boxes that pop up in the corner of your screen, which just divert you from what you’re doing. But then, you know, people have said to me, actually, you need to do emails, because emails are sort of low quality, low attention tasks, but batch them up together and do them maybe after lunch, when you’re in a bit of a post lunch dip or something like that, where you don’t need to concentrate on something for a long, long period of time. Just batching them up. Batching podcast recording up, batching different types of task has really revolutionised things. So really important principle and I love the way we can apply that to clinical types of work as well.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Sure.

Dr Rachel Morris

So what’s your number three?

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Number three. You kind of beat me to it. Switch off the notification.

Dr Rachel Morris

Ah okay. Yeah, yeah.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Definitely. So switching off the notifications is probably one of the best things you could ever do. And the reason for that is like you said, you get interrupted all the time. You will get this pop up this pop up and it just diverts you and more importantly, it can stop you doing things as well. So I’m a massive fan of system one. However, system one has a couple of flaws, and one of them is that when you get notification, you could be happily typing the patient’s notes, you know, focusing on the patient, writing on the keyboard, blah blah blah, you come to the screen – there’s a notification on there that’s stopped you from actually putting things in.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yes.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

And half the stuff you’ve just written isn’t actually there on the system now, because this notification popped up, so switch them off. Just switch them off. Simple as that. If something is so urgent that somebody needs your attention. The method for them getting your attention should be knocking on your door. And the other part of that is, the only time they should be knocking on your door is basically to tell you somebody’s pretty much –

Dr Rachel Morris

Arrested in the waiting room.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

– dying outside to be honest. Yeah.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

I mean, I used to say it should be there’s a fire going off. But to be honest, the fire alarms should be going off at that stage you know. But it is that principle that, you know, if it’s important enough to interrupt you, it has to be important enough to stop you doing whatever you could be doing. Not whatever you might be doing, whatever you could be doing. So, you know, and making that very clear to the people around you as well that I should only get an interruption physically at the door if you know this, this, or this has happened. That’s it. If it’s not that, you don’t interrupt me that way. But then the other thing with switching off the notifications is then relying on the earlier thing which is batching, it’s making sure that within your day you’ve got structure to check those things. Because there’s no point switching off all the notifications and then never checking them. Yeah, so my day is very much time tabled in the sense that I’ve got periods of time where I know I have to do this. I have to do this. And having that regular routine in my clinical practice just means that I get through things. So like I said pathology in the morning, I’ve got letters later on in the afternoon, I’ll check my notifications around about three o’clock in the afternoon where I’ve got a bit of dead time normally. Task and stuff I tend to do towards the end of the day because actually, that’s when I’m most effective at doing tasks. And in my view, tasks shouldn’t be dealt with in any other kind of format, because I want to make sure I’m dealing with them again in a batch format, do them all in one go so then it’s sorted and I think better when it’s the end. It’s finding what works for you, definitely, but also what works within systems in the practice as well. So there’s no point doing your prescriptions first thing the morning if the influx of prescriptions is at two o’clock in the afternoon.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yes.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

That’s pointless because you’re still gonna have a huge load waiting for you at the end. And you’re going to be like I need to do those and the temptations going off to do them. And yeah, so work around the process in the practice or whatever but at the same time work what’s best for you.

Dr Rachel Morris

Can I just ask you this thing about prescriptions coming in later in the day? So, yeah, I was talking to someone who issue was that a lot of prescriptions came instead of later in the evening. And then just sort of got left and people thinking oh I’ve got to do my prescriptions before I go. But they hadn’t come in till sort of four or five o’clock and people feeling like they’ve got to stay until 8, 9, 10,  to get everything done rather than leaving to the appropriate person. What would you say to those sorts of people that are worrying about that?

Dr Hussain Ghandi

So I’d say to people that are worrying about that first of all, why are you worrying? You know the process in your practice should be that this is our routine turnaround time for prescriptions and if that system works in that process then that’s how it works, you know? So we have in our practice, ours is a two day turnaround for routine prescriptions and you know there has to be a reason why that works. Now if you want to make that shorter, that’s fine, if you want to make it so that’s a quicker process. So if all the prescriptions, for example, your intake, any prescription before 12 o’clock in the afternoon will be dealt with within two working days, those be dealt with. Call it 12 o’clock Monday morning, all the prescriptions that come in by that point will be ready for Wednesday afternoon.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Yep. Then you need to make sure that process works. So there’s no point having it so that all those are collated and then they end up in the GP’s inbox Tuesday morning. But then that GP doesn’t have any time to deal with them till Wednesday morning, because and the stress of trying to get them dealt with is just gonna build up so that process within the practice needs to work. That’s number one. The second part is in your mind, understanding how urgent is that task? So you know you like you said the GP that comes across them at four o’clock in the afternoon sees this big pile of prescriptions and oh they have to be done. Why? Why do they have to be done if they don’t actually need to be ready till Wednesday morning? That’s fine. You’ve got process of dissemination for those pro, you know, within equal share people in practice and stuff. That’s how it should work. And you shouldn’t feel bad about that. Now clearly if you want to aim for a quicker turnaround time, if you want to aim for clearing your desk, which I know a lot people, that’s the motivation for doing this kind of thing. Then actually look at, is that what you need to be doing for you? How much stress is that causing to you, how much change is that making to the practice, how much benefit is that giving to the patients? Because whatever you’re doing is stopping you from doing something else. And that’s the part I think many people forget. You know, you’ve only got a finite amount of time that you can dedicate to whatever you’re doing. If you doing one thing instead of another then you’re not doing the other thing and which one’s more important overall and trying to balance that perspective.

Dr Rachel Morris

I think people really worry about the perception that they’re dumping work on their colleagues.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Yeah, I can understand that. But again, if the process in the practice has been that those prescriptions will come in and actually you’re not meant to be doing them, why you’re feeling you’re dumping? If that’s the case, raise the issue and look at is our current system working for us? If it’s not, is there a better way we can do that? Is it that actually like you say that the person who’s in on the afternoon deals with all the prescriptions so then they don’t get any in the morning because they’re dealing with them all in the afternoon. Is that what you need to think about? Is it that you need to potentially extend the time for routine prescriptions? And how does that work with pharmacies near the kind of stuff? Is it that you change the influx time for prescriptions for patients and say that you know, we will take prescription all way up until four o’clock on, and then you know, they’re dealt with the following morning because you’ve got a bigger catch in time and stuff. So it’s looking at those systems and processes and understanding what they actually mean. Not just there’s this work. Somebody go off and do it.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. So I know that on your podcast you often discuss the sort of tech hacks, the things that make our lives easier. What would be, you know, if you could force all GPs to have one particular tech solution and one app, what would it be?

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Yeah, so one tech solution hands down for me would be videoconferencing. Yeah. So, this past six months or so, I’ve really got invested into this in terms of spending time and looking how it works. And it works simply put. Particularly for my PCN, I can appreciate for many people, for patient facing roles, this may not be as effective, although video consultations is something we need to look at moving forward. And is going to be part of a contract from 2021. And I’m not gonna talk about video consultation because that’s a whole other matter videoconferencing and in terms of, you know, meetings within practice between practices, within PCNs,  oh, my God the amount of time you can save is significant. I will counteract that with that physical meetings clearly have immense value, not just value but immense value, and the networking opportunities. And that, you know, emotional aspect that you get from being in a room with people is exceptionally valuable. However, GPs are unbelievably expensive people. Our time is so valuable and spending; unfortunately we get asked to attend lots of meetings.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

So if you have to do that, would an online meeting would a video conferencing meeting actually mean that that works more effectively for you? You can dial in, dial out. And actually, if it’s just a brief discussion or catching people from across a diverse geographical area. Is that a better way of doing it? And more importantly, what I tend to find works better is hybrid meetings.

Dr Rachel Morris

Ok.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

So what I mean by that is that you have a meeting where people can congregate and meet, but at the same time you allow people the opportunity to join in via videoconferencing. So it’s not just a video meeting where everybody is dialling in, but it’s the combination of the two, and the value from that is really significant because then the people that prefer the face to face or don’t like the medium of interacting online, they can have the option of coming. If they don’t or if they can’t make it because of whatever geographical reasons, timing issues, that kind of stuff, or even because they’re in clinic. You know, I’ve had online meetings where people have had to be on call, so they have to physically be in the practice, and they may have to dip out and deal with a patient. But then they can just switch it off at that point.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, yeah.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

And the other amazing thing is, most of these systems will record the meeting.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yes.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

And having the recording available for you to then look at, to then say, actually, I can now capture the entire context of what was discussed has so much more value than reading a set a minutes. Because no matter how good the minute taker is, they will never be able to capture context, particularly in terms of what people have said, because they always just end up reading a transcript that will take you two hours to read it anyway. And most people won’t want to do that. Whereas listening to something that’s been recorded or watching something that’s been recorded, particularly with the power of things like YouTube and stuff, being able to speed it up slightly so you can listen and watch back at 1.2 or 1.3. Whatever your brain can cope with, you know, it takes, you know, for example, an hour long meeting down to 50 minutes. Awesome bit of time saving. But I’ve still got the value in the context of what’s happened in that meeting to reflect on particularly if decisions are being made with my involvement. I want to know what’s happening there, and that can be a more effective way rather than just simply you know going over minutes. And the minutes may be enough, but then, if you want the deeper context, you’ve got it. You’ve got access to it.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah. Great idea.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Definitely.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah. In fact, I was reading a Harvard Business Review article just this morning about remote working. How you can promote that sort of teamwork amongst remote workers and problem is, that they were identifying was too much video conferencing means you don’t get those informal interactions which you get when you make face to face. And they were suggesting actually start your meeting 10 minutes earlier, the organiser just like puts it open so people can come in with a coffee and do a bit of small talk and leave open for 10 minutes at the end so that people can, I mean you can stop the recording – you can choose how long you record for can’t you?

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Yeah.

Dr Rachel Morris

But people can then just chat and you know, if they want to have a little break out room, you can do that as well. So that’s really good.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

And interestingly – so obviously, this won’t be going at the time that this happens. But tomorrow I’m attending the King’s Fund event based in Nottingham and one of things I’ve been asked to talk about is technology, and how you can use that. And one of the big things I say to particularly networks is this is a way of trying to save you time.  Network meetings can be really challenging thing when you’re trying to get various different groups of people into room and that kind of stuff, and people get really annoyed with meetings as well because there’s so many of them. So the potential of having online video conferencing where you can dip in, dip out offers value.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

That’s number one. In terms of apps you’re asked me about, so I’ve got two that I’m going to quickly mention. So it’s not necessarily an app, but it’s an app system, and that’s something called Calendly.

Dr Rachel Morris

Oh yes.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

It’s basically a scheduling app, and the reason why I love this is that I have pretty much removed the whole negotiating with people in terms of when I’m free and for a one on one meeting it works amazingly well because I only have to negotiate with one person. I can simply say here’s my link for when I’m free, you pick the time that’s best for you and it will automatically book it. I get a notification then to say this person’s booked it and actually, if it turns around, and it doesn’t work for me, I can adjust it from there, but often it works because I’ve set that those are the times that I’m available and that kind of stuff. And that’s how we arranged this meeting.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yep.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

You know I sent you my Calendly link. You booked into it and we were fine, we were sorted. You know we only touched base I think last night to say that yeah we’re still going ahead. Yeah. Love it. Absolutely love it, it’s made a massive difference to me in terms of stress with organising meetings. And I don’t tend to have now the whole are you free. Oh I’m not free then, oh are you free then. You know that that back and forth.

Dr Rachel Morris

Saves 20 emails doesn’t it. And there is a free version you can use.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Definitely so if you just have one meeting type yep it’s completely free to use. If you want various different things. So again, I have lots of hats and actually felt found the value of this for me, it’s not the biggest cost in the world, it works out something like £8 a month plus VAT. I went for the paid version, and it integrates directly with my calendar, so I don’t have to then worry about it not being there. It just works. And then my other one is a to do app. So I mentioned earlier that IKE was my preferred to do app. The reason why I’ve changed from IKE. The one thing it doesn’t do, which I’ve been looking for, which another app now does, is voice integration from Google. So I would love to be able to say okay, Google, this. Yeah, but to say that and then remind me X, Y, Z.

Dr Rachel Morris

Okay right.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Yeah and unfortunately IKE doesn’t have that integration.

Dr Rachel Morris

Okay.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Because one of things that I’ve realised now, particularly when I’m driving, lots of things come into my head. I struggle to, because obviously I’m driving, I don’t want to pull out my phone, I don’t want to start jotting things down. I don’t want to stop what I’m doing, particularly when I’m doing longer drives and stuff. So having a method that allows me to record those kind of ideas in my head effectively. So I now use Microsoft to do, which is actually pretty decent. And the other thing I happened to find is that this works also works really well on my computer. So it pings up when I want it to, in terms of like, I use the Microsoft surface. So it’s there, it integrates very well, updates automatically, and I have to admit it has improved some of the flow of my to do list aspect of things because now I can see everything on both devices. Because the other problem I had with IKE, IKE wasn’t available on my computer.

Dr Rachel Morris

Right.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

It was only on my smartphone. So having it slightly more integrated has worked better for me. But I do miss the Eisenhower matrix I have to admit.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yes. Yeah. Brilliant. Okay, so there’s those two tech apps and anything else you can suggest to listeners before we sign off.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

I think, you know, people often get blighted by the tech. They see amazing kind of pieces of tech and say, yeah, I want to use this. I want to do that. You know, let’s do it. That can be really useful. What I would say is try not to get sucked into the platform itself. Look at the value you’re going to get from the tech itself, from the tech, rather than what the tech necessarily looks like or does. Find the things that work for you. The reason why there’s about 1000 to do apps is because everybody’s different every likes the way that things worked better in one way, then another in that kind of, and they can all do really amazing things. But find the feature that speaks to you and focus on that and then more importantly, stick with it.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Because people try them for about a couple of days. I think I don’t know if I like this, it’s too hard. Well, it’s either too hard because you don’t get the app because it doesn’t work the way it should do in terms of your work flow. That may be something you need to think about or it’s because you’ve just not given it enough time to embed in what the system can do for you. Or it’s just the wrong one for you.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

That’s just, you know, you need to think about something else. But giving it enough time to see if it works, because often they can do and sticking with it.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah and I think also then scheduling in time every single week to review your to do list.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Definitely. So, like I say Friday mornings for me I have half a hour where I just review everything. Not just my PCN stuff. It’s the time I’m free. In that point of the day I will review everything from my PCN work, from my IGP learning stuff, from my personal stuff. Have I done everything I need to for this week? If haven’t what have I missed, or more importantly, looking forward what am I going to do.  And it’s that review time, that’s probably the most important thing, even more so than creating the list in the first place. No point having a list if you’re not looking at it.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, yeah, and that is definitely my learning from this podcast is that I’m going to start putting in time. I think Fridays is a really good time to do actually, because then you’re all set up for Monday when it comes around and you know what you’re doing.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Exactly.

Dr Rachel Morris

And you have a weekend feeling pretty stress free thinking, well, actually, yeah, I know I need to do, I’ve lots of time to do it, and let’s just enjoy the weekend. Those of us who aren’t working.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Exactly. So I know for some people, you know what they would tend to do is they review their list just before they go to bed with the intention that they’re not going to do anything. But they know what they need to do tomorrow. So they’ve got it clear in their head. I need to do this, this and this tomorrow. And the other part with that is making sure that what you think you can achieve is realistic. You know, don’t put 20 things your to do list to do tomorrow when you’ve only got an hour, it’s not gonna happen. And you’re just gonna get stressed and it’s not gonna get done. If that’s the case. Reallocate. Look at what’s important. Figure out – more importantly and then take it from there rather than just oh, my gosh, I need to do 50 things tomorrow.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Because it ain’t gonna happen. That’s the reality of things.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah. Time always. Things always take us sort of twice as long as we expect they’re going to do, that’s in my in my experience, I need to allocate twice the amount of time. Thank you so much Ghandi. That has been absolutely brilliant and really, really helpful for our listeners. If people want to get hold of you, hear your podcast, how can they do that?

Dr Hussain Ghandi

So best thing to do is search for EGP learning. So that can be either the website, which is egplearning.co.uk or as you mentioned I’m on pretty much every major social media platform going. So Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, LinkedIn – I think I’ve even got a Snapchat account, but I don’t really look at that one to be honest. So don’t bother going there.

Dr Rachel Morris

Oh wow.

Dr Hussain Ghandi

Yeah, but the best places to get me actually is Twitter. I’m on there most of the time and stuff so EGP learning or @DrGandalf52. And just to point out I’m not 52 years old because a lot of people assume that. It’s a separate reason for having 52. But yeah, Twitter is a good way contact to me. Or, like I said, the website and definitely subscribe to the platforms, whichever you’d prefer. So the podcast is EGP Learning podcast and the YouTube is again EGP Learning.

Dr Rachel Morris

Brilliant. It’s a great podcast. I would recommend it. So thank you so much for your time today and look forward to speaking to you again hopefully soon.

Dr Rachel Morris

Definitely. Thank you guys.

Dr Rachel Morris

Cheers. Thank you then. Bye.

Dr Rachel Morris

Thanks for listening. If you’ve enjoyed this episode then please do subscribe to the podcast and also please rate it on iTunes so that other people can find it too. Do follow me on Twitter at Dr. Rachel Morris, and you can find out more about the face to face and online courses which I run on the youarenotafrog.co.uk website. Bye for now.

Episode 20 – A creative solution to stress with Ruth Cocksedge

In this episode, Rachel is joined by Ruth Cocksedge a Practitioner Psychologist who started her career as a mental health nurse. She practices in Cambridge and has a particular interest in EMDR for PTSD and creative writing as a way to improve mental health and wellbeing.

Episode 11 – The magical art of reading sweary books

In this episode, Rachel is joined once again by Dr Liz O’Riordan, the ‘Breast Surgeon with Breast Cancer’, TEDx speaker, author, blogger, triathlete and all round superstar who has been nominated for ‘Woman of the Year’.

Previous Podcasts.

Ways to stay in touch.

Join the community

Fill in just a few details to hear about the latest tools, services and resources designed to help GPs and others members of the Primary Care team become more resourceful and resilient in the workplace.

@ Copyright 2019 Wild Monday Resilience Ltd (Reg no 11673722)

[/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]
2020-01-10T12:13:23+00:00