Episode 17: The Self-Help Book Club – First Edition, with Dr Nik Kendrew

In this episode, Rachel is joined again by Dr Nik Kendrew, self-confessed self-help bookaholic to chat about books and apps that have made an impact on their lives recently.

We chat about how reading self-help books sometimes gets a bad press and how we, personally get an immense amount of value from them. Amongst other recommendations, Nik talks about ‘The Little Book of Resilience’ by Matthew Johnstone and the effect that this book has had on him, from understanding how we all put on a ‘show face’ to taking hold of the principle that ‘It’s OK to not feel OK’.

We also talk about the enormous pressure that GPs are under and the importance of looking after yourself, seeking help where necessary and identifying some of those thoughts we believe are facts but are, in fact, just thoughts after all.

Put all your transcript content in here.

Podcast links

Podcast links

The Little Book of Resilience, Matthew Johnstone

Headspace App

https://drchatterjee.com/blog/category/podcast/

Stress Proof: The ultimate guide to living a stress free life Dr Mithu Stonroni

Follow Nik on Twitter @nikkendrew

For help and support for GPs https://gphealth.nhs.uk

Sign up for downloadable CPD reflection forms plus more tools and resources

For more episodes of You are not a frog, check out our website www.youarenotafrog.co.uk and sign up to our mailing list here for loads of useful resources about thriving at work.

Follow Rachel on twitter @DrRachelMorris or LinkedIn and find out more about her online and face to face courses for doctors on surviving and thriving at work at www.shapesfordoctors.com or for other organisations at www.wildmonday.co.uk

Podcast transcript

Welcome to Episode 17 of You Are Not a Frog: The Self Help Book Club  – First Edition.

Dr Rachel Morris

Welcome to you are not a frog, the podcast for GPs, hospital doctors and other busy people in high stress jobs. Working in today’s high stress environment, you may feel like a frog in boiling water. Things have heated up so slowly that you might not have noticed the extra long days becoming the norm. You’ve got used to feeling constantly busy and are often one crisis away from not coping. Let’s face it, frogs only have two choices: to stay in the pan and get boiled alive, or to hop out and leave. But you are not a frog, and that’s where this podcast comes in. You have many more choices than you think you do. There are simple changes that you can make, which will make a huge difference to your stress levels and help you enjoy life again. I’m your host Dr Rachel Morris, GPs and executive coach and specialist in resilience at work. I’ll be talking to friends, colleagues, and experts, all who have an interesting take on this so that together we can take back control to survive and really thrive in our work and lives.

Dr Rachel Morris

I’d like to tell you about our new CPD forms. If you want to learn while you listen and claim CPD points, then go to the link in the show notes and sign up to receive our fully downloadable podcast CPD forms. Each one is populated with show notes and links so that you could listen, reflect, and then note down what you’re going to do. A quick, easy, and enjoyable way to do your CPD.

Dr Rachel Morris

Before we get into the podcast, I thought I’d let you know a little bit about what I’ve been up to. So I’ve been working with loads of training hub CEPNS and LMCs to provide training for resilience and retention for GPs,  practice managers and other members of the primary healthcare team. So if you work in a training hub or are looking for some practical and effective training to help you beat stress, increase your resilience and productivity, then please get in touch.  And we know that connection with others is so, so important, so we also can train GP’s to facilitate and run peer groups for support in their area. Again, get in touch with me if you’d like to know more about this.

Dr Rachel Morris

Those of you that’ve been listening to the podcast for a while may have heard Nik Kendrew on episode one: when doctors get ill.  He provided a really frank and candid sort of exploration of what happened when he got ill, how he felt and how he coped. So I thought I’d get him back on the podcast because me and him sort of share a love of what we call self help books or what our partners call self help books – we really love them. And we thought it’d be really useful to share some of the books that we’ve been reading, chat about them, and talk about why they’ve helped us. So this is the first edition of the Self Help Book Club. I hope they’re going to be many more. If you guys have any suggestions for books that we could talk about or books that we should read, then please get in touch with us. Or you can send us a direct message on Twitter or email us and all the links in the show notes below. So I hope you enjoy this episode.

Dr Rachel Morris

So it’s really brilliant to have back with me on the podcast today Nik Kendrew, Nik do you want to just introduce yourself for those of you who don’t know you?

Dr Nik Kendrew

Hi Rachel, thank you so much for having me back here, it’s lovely to be here. I’m Nik Kendrew, I’m a GP down in Kent and I work eight sessions a week in general practice, and in my spare time I worked for Red Whale – I’m a GP update presenter and I also work with them on a lot of their digital content and we do live webinars. We’ve just done one with versus arthritis and we’re doing our deep dives courses at the moment where we’re looking into sort of topics at a deeper level, but with a fun spin to it. And they’re going really well. And it’s really exciting and fun to do, so that’s what’s keeping me sane at the moment.

Dr Rachel Morris

So you may recognise Nik from sort of various Facebook lives and webinars and all those sorts of things. So Nik has been on  one of our really, really popular podcasts. In fact, he was on the first one ever.

Dr Nik Kendrew

I was.

Dr Rachel Morris

He was, and actually which had a really great response and great feedback. And we came up for the idea for this podcast, I think sitting on a train. Was that right?

Dr Nik Kendrew

Uh huh. As you do.

Dr Rachel Morris

Coming back from Reading where we’d both been doing some stuff with Red Whale. And you know, both of us, I guess we would describe ourselves – well, I wouldn’t describe myself as a self-help junkie, my husband would describe me as a self help junkie, but I don’t like to call these books self help books. I don’t know. What do you think?

Dr Nik Kendrew

I think, yeah, I mean, I’ve always called them self-help books because that’s what other people have called, called them when they’ve said oh what’re you reading? Oh, another self-help book. So I’m not sure what it says about me. But I remember a few years ago I was talking to one of my friends and they were saying that I could build quite a big bonfire with all the self help books that I’ve bought, and it would go on for quite a long time. Not sure it help global warming very much. So, that’s the kind of level that I have come to it from, but it’s almost like, I mean, I am kind of a sales person’s dream in that if I listened to somebody talking about their new book, I’d be the one going I’m going to get that. That’s going to be brilliant. And there’s so many books that I’ve listened to, you know people chatting on the radio and stuff like that and ended up buying them. I have to say I’ve not read all of them, I have got a shelf of books to read. You know, a lot of them made me feel so much better about things. And even if it’s a chapter or two, if you can then apply it to where you’re up to and it might be that it’s that chapter that’s relevant to you at that point in time. And so maybe that’s why I got so many different books. Because life changes so rapidly. It’s a bespoke self help shelf. Shall we call it? How about that?

Dr Rachel Morris

Bespoke self help shelf. I mean, I’m exactly the same. I’m dreadful when I listen to podcasts, for example Rongan Chatterjee’s podcast, I think it’s called live well feel better. He always has these experts on who’re really, really interesting. And almost every time I listen to that I end up buying the book of the person who’s on.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Exactly.

Dr Nik Kendrew

I believe them as well, because they all, you know, they all quite rightly so say this is a really good book because they’ve put in all their life and soul in, and are really passionate about it, and that comes across. Then I, I’m very much I buy into that, and I believe it all and that’s why I – I’ve even got things in my Amazon save for later bit in my basket, ready to buy in the future when they’re released.

Dr Rachel Morris

That’s when you know you’ve got a serious habit.

Dr Nik Kendrew

So yeah. Hold off, maybe there’s a self help book – terrible, isn’t it? Maybe I need a self help book for people that read too many self help books. Perhaps that’s the thing.

Dr Rachel Morris

Probably.

Dr Nik Kendrew

I should write that, how about that?

Dr Rachel Morris

You should write it Nik. But I think that actually, they’ve got a bad rap and they’re not really self help books. When I look at the stuff that’s on my book shelf. You know, things like the five choices by The Covey Foundation, there’s Arianna Huffington’s Thrive. I’m literally just reading out some, I’m looking behind me now. Mindsight by Daniel Siegel, there’s a really good book called  stress proof by someone who was on the podcast with Rangan Chatterjee. But there’s also things like Malcolm Gladwell and Daniel Pink and a lot of these sort of business books, and I’m sure a businessman wouldn’t like to call them self help books. They’re just sort of productivity and how to live well books. And I always think as well you get an awful lot of value out of books, like you said, people tend to put their life’s work into a book, and that’s much, much cheaper than, say, buying a very expensive online course to learn it, when actually, just read the book.

Dr Nik Kendrew

And often with certain books, particularly when I’m thinking about my patients, a lot of the books that I recommend to them would actually be cheaper or a similar price to a prescription. And that’s how I kind of pitch it to them and they kind of go, ooh, ok. And of course it’s gonna last a lot longer than the medication that they buy. And yes, there’s obviously a place for medication to the right kind of patient, but there’s so much that we can do to help with lifestyle, and changes that they can make in their lifestyle to make their lives better. And hopefully, by having read some of these books, we just have a little bit of an insight into ones of which may be more helpful to recommend and more accessible. Because perhaps if you’re going through a stressful time, the last thing you need is a book that is literally, you know, really small print. Really thick. Feels like it’s an absolutely marathon to get through. And sometimes you need books which have slightly different format which are more accessible and they’re not going to make you feel more frazzled when you’ve read them.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, yeah. A great example of books I recommend to patients is that Mark Williams book, finding mindfulness, finding peace in a frantic world. And, you know, that has just been absolutely brilliant. And it’s got so much in, it’s really, really helpful for me too, and I think that all doctors should read that as well. So you know –

Dr Nik Kendrew

Absolutely. And that’s also got an audio that it comes with. Do we still have CDs? It does I think, they also, I’m guessing there’s a downloadable version.

Dr Rachel Morris

You can get it free, you can get those meditations free on audible, so you can.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Fantastic. Well, I can’t recommend them highly enough because I often when I pitch it to a patient I’ll say that’s the book if you feel up to reading the background and the more verbose part of it. But if – the very least you can do is to listen to some mindfulness and particularly, I think, it’s track three (not that I listen to it that often) the body scan –

Dr Rachel Morris

Off the top of my head. Track three.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Exactly. Somebody check that, but I’m sure it is, and it’s the body scan, which is amazing and it always makes me feel so much better, and it doesn’t take too long to do it. And one of the other tracks, maybe track eight, maybe track seven, is mindful movement, and that’s something I’ve kind of done a bit more recently, and I found that helpful too. But I’d say mindfulness I’ve found really useful myself. I’ve had a few sort of health issues in the past, and we talked about one of them last time and more recently without going into too much detail, more recently I’ve had some more, some kind of heart issues, and whereas in the past I used to be able to train and run half marathons. I’ve now had to kind of reframe what I can do regarding that. I’d love to try and run a half marathon in the future. I think it’s quite a long way off, but it’s something I’d have to build up to, it’s certainly not something I could do at the moment. But what I’ve found amazing is mindful running. Suddenly it takes –

Dr Rachel Morris

Wow, is that a thing.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Yeah, it is a thing. And there’s actually books being written about it. And there’s a few apps on it as well. Um some of the more popular sort of mindfulness app – are we allowed to name names?

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, go on. Well, we’re not getting any incomes from it. No, no, we’re not sponsoring anything when we talk about this. We’re genuinely recommending because we’ve found it helpful.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Yeah absolutely. And so you know what I do on the head space app.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah that’s fantastic.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Yeah, it is brilliant. And I use that probably in fact, that in many ways that’s probably replaced a lot off the self help books. So maybe it’s saved me money, because I do subscribe to it. So maybe it saved me money as I’m not buying so many books now. It has mindful activities. So you can do mindful running, you can do mindful walks even, if you’re not even up to running. And also Andy Puddicombe who does the, who’s in charge basically, he’s Mr Headspace. He’s actually done some mindfulness running sort of scenarios where you can do a mindful run with the Nike running app, which is free so you don’t necessarily have to subscribe to head space, but I do it all the time and taking the pressure off the goal orientated me that used to do you know have to do running this certain time trying to get quicker and quicker and quicker when suddenly you can’t do that anymore it’s actually really lovely. It’s more like what can you do and about sort of having a more functional approach to what you can achieve, and that’s been really helpful.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, it’s interesting we were gonna call this the self help book club, but I think we probably need to call it the self help book and app club actually.

Dr Nik Kendrew

I think that’s a yes, definitely. That’s a good idea. There’s lots of them around.

Dr Rachel Morris

There are. Headspace is one I do particularly like, and there are lots of free mindfulness apps. But I have recently subscribed to Headspace, it is just brilliant. Just if you could set 10 minutes aside every morning, I’ve been going through the reducing stress one interestingly.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Yes I think I’ve done that one yes.

Dr Rachel Morris

The exercise where you sort of have to imagine yourself being filled with liquid sunshine.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Exactly, absolutely. At the beginning of that I was thinking about sunny delight from the 90s. I had to take that out of my head because didn’t that turn people orange? Exactly. So, yeah, take that out your head but it’s lovely, it’s a lovely thought and feeling of all that sunshine filling your body and making you feel better and relaxing all the different parts of your body. Um, I find that really helpful, and it’s really good as well, because that part of the course that you’re doing, there are mini sort of micro mindfulness things which are about three minutes. I think that one is called refresh, and so I often do that literally just before I start afternoon surgery. Even if I’m literally bang on time, I will spare three minutes to do that and I feel so much better, and certainly the first couple of patients really benefit from that because I’m in a much better place and I’m much kind of more open and calmer and feel much more like me, and I like to think , though I’ve not managed to do it yet, but if I was having a really frazzled morning, I’d actually say, actually, lets pause things now. I’m just going to you know, do it now for three minutes. And sometimes people have knocked on my door and  gone oh I have just come back as I thought I heard somebody in your room. But it was actually just me listening to three minutes of mindfulness because, you know, Andy Puddicombe’s got quite a deep, booming voice and so they thought somebody’s in the room. Maybe there’s something in that. Maybe play it all the time and people won’t disturb you.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yes! Yeah, I’ve mentioned this several times before. Catherine Hickman who was on the episode about tiny habits and making tiny changes. She does something called a squeegee breath in between patients which is some sort of ritual routine, which helps us sort of get rid of all the baggage from the last person and just sort of calm herself before the next person. And I think that’s really, really helpful. You know, all of these practices and they are practices because I’ve really struggled doing mindfulness because my head is just everywhere. The minute I sit down, it just, I start thinking about what I’m doing with the business and what we’re going to do next, and all these sort of things. And it just shows how mentally cluttered you are actually, when you start doing this and I’m getting getting better. I know it’s not a competition about who and I know it’s not about getting brilliant at it, but just actually starting to be able to notice your thoughts and your internal emotions, and I think they call it the sort, the weather pattern of your emotions has been so helpful.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Absolutely. It’s hugely liberating, and I find that the animations that are on Headspace as well are really useful because there’s a brilliant one where they’re looking at, you basically, you’re stood by the side of a motorway and all these busy cars are going past, and you’re thinking that these are your thoughts and if you’re not sort of used to mindfulness, you kind of think ooh panic and chase after it and it’s lying on this motorway and it’s all frantic. Whereas if you take a step back and you just go ooh that’s panic going past there, there’s anxiety and you just noting it gone. It’s wonderful, and the other one I find useful is the visualisation about – even if you’re having a rubbish day and you know the clouds are in the sky. You know, it’s all very grey. If you just visualise yourself almost like in a drone going up through the clouds and then you get to this wonderful blue sky and I had this very powerful visualisation which has just developed as I’ve done the mindfulness where I’m kind of standing at the very top off a bit like the Grand Canyon. It feels like it’s some kind of very simple, very red mountains and all that kind of stuff, and I’m looking down and it’s blue sky all around me, and it’s almost like looking into this well of clouds and as they float past those are your thoughts. And that kind of works for me, and it just feels really lovely to have sometimes, the time to do that. It sounds like I do it all the time. I wish I did. But you know, when I do that, I find it really helpful.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah. I think the nice thing about the headspace app is that it is just there on your phone. You don’t need to sort of work out how to do it. You just literally start the app and press play, and then you’re off and just do it. It’s just really low hassle because sometimes I guess we’re busy doctors just mindfulness seems like another thing you ought to be doing.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Yeah, and it’s not gonna be right for everyone, you know. But I think the only thing that I find slightly conflicted in is what we’re telling all our patients to get off their devices. And then we’re recommending apps that are on their phones. But before I do that, I’ll kind of go through with them about making sure they turned the night mode on if it’s an iPhone. I’m sure it must be on Android phones, too. And I actually set it in this kind of weather put this time of year when it got the darker evenings, I’ll set it to come on about six o’clock. And so basically, I don’t want the blue light to overstimulate me in the evenings and I recommend that for my patient too and what else do I do? Obviously talk to them about the screen time because they can get notifications of how much time they’re spending on their screen. Remind them to not look at their screen one hour before bedtime and all that kind of stuff. It’s about kind of screen discipline I suppose isn’t it.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, that is a problem, isn’t it? It’s a real paradox that what one of the main things that people tend to take away when I do my wellbeing sessions with people is, you know, to actually charge your phone downstairs and get an alarm clock. Because it’s not just the blue light that causes us lack of sleep. Because, of course, it interferes with your melatonin, your natural sort of sleep cycle. But it’s the fact that well, when I go and set my alarm, I then go all right. Okay. Ooh, while I’m here, let’s just check what I’m doing tomorrow. And have I sent that text? And ooh, then just check my emails and then I’ve done another half an hour working and I’m thinking about it. So there is that danger with the phones that whenever we pick them up to do anything, it just sucks us back into work. So can you use head? You can’t use headspace on aeroplane mode can you because it has to connect to the internet?

Dr Nik Kendrew

Well, there’s certain ones that you can download.

Dr Rachel Morris

Ok.

Dr Nik Kendrew

And so they are on your phone. The ones that you can’t, as far as I’m aware, there are kind of much longer sleep ones as you’re going off to sleep, they last about 45 minutes or so, and I have put it on aeroplane mode and then realised that it kind of stopped after about, I don’t know, maybe, arbitrary speaking, about 15 minutes or so, but hopefully you might be asleep by then anyway. The much longer ones you can’t download. But there are many, many of them you can, and so therefore it can be on aeroplane mode. And so that’s why, by and large, if I’m putting it on as I go to sleep, a number of the sleep ones you can download so that’s good.

Dr Rachel Morris

Ok. Yeah. So it’s getting away from just using our phones all the time, however, our phones are really, really good tools. Again, Catherine Hickman said she’s got this app on phone it’s called the Forest App, which grows a tree if you don’t look at your phone.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Ahh.

Dr Rachel Morris

On the screen, so it’s sort of a gameifying not looking at your phone in a way.

Dr Nik Kendrew

But then you’d be thinking, ooh, I wonder how that tree is getting on.

Dr Rachel Morris

And you’d be checking your tree.

Dr Nik Kendrew

No! I’ve just murdered a tree!

Dr Rachel Morris

That’s self control Nik.  Bit of self control.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Yes exactly. But that sounds like a good thing. It’s all about training people not to look at their phones quite so much because it’s amazing how we’ve change so much in just over a decade. I mean I remember when smartphones first came out. And, you know, I remember when phones first had cameras on them and oh for goodness sake I don’t want a camera on my phone. I just want to be able to make phone calls.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Dr Nik Kendrew

What kind of a dinosaur do I sound like now? You know –

Dr Rachel Morris

When I went to university, we didn’t even have phones.

Dr Nik Kendrew

No pagers.

Dr Rachel Morris

Pagers.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Did you ever have pagers?

Dr Rachel Morris

No, not as a student no. I had a landline.

Dr Nik Kendrew

My friends, who are from more affluent backgrounds, had mobile phones that their parents brought them. And then there was always the row when the bill came through because they’ve been phoning all sorts of people all over the world. So I got a like a, it’s a 1 to 1, which was the precursor to whatever you know. And it was a pager that you had and so you could dial a number and leave it. I like it. It was a numerical message. And so if my parents put in their phone numbers. So it was my parents. I won’t say it now because people might phone them. And then I’d know it was my Mum and Dad and I’d have to phone them because they wanted to speak to me and I remember that 1402 meant I love you.

Dr Rachel Morris

Awww.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Aww.

Dr Rachel Morris

That’s really sweet.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Because that’s obviously valentines day.

Dr Rachel Morris

Oh I was going to say why was it that number. Wow Nik, things I didn’t know about you, you carried a pager around at university.

Dr Nik Kendrew

I think it was hidden. I think in those days it was a bit cool. Yeah, I don’t I don’t know. Maybe it’s really embarrassing. A few people had them. I wasn’t an early adopter. It was quite small and discreet somewhere. I’m digging it. Hold, yeah, let’s move on.

Dr Rachel Morris

Anyway, anyway. So, we’re gonna form this sort of self help book club which we thought people might be interested in with all these different books that we’ve been reading and you were telling me about a book that you’ve bean reading recently that’s really sort of helped you. Which book is that?

Dr Nik Kendrew

Well, now it’s really interesting. So it’s kind of what I was saying earlier that sometimes when you’re so frazzled that reading a really verbose book is not the answer and so in my hands I have the Little Book of Resilience, which is written and illustrated by Matthew Johnston. Now he is based in Australia and he’s also, he is the director, the creator of the Black Dog Institute, and he is an author and illustrator and a photographer. And so he kind of very much advocates the fact that a picture paints 1000 words. And so when you are struggling, the last thing you want to do is to read all these words and so he has written quite a few words, but nowhere near as many as you’d find in a normal life changing book, shall we call it? And so lots of it are illustrations, which are just beautiful in themselves but hugely meaningful. And he’s written a lot of other books as well. So the book I’m gonna talk about is about resilience, how to bounce back from adversity and lead a fulfilling life. But he’s also written other books, probably most famously, I had a black Dog, which is his book about depression, which I recommend to many patients and maybe we’ll talk about that another time. But again, it is one of those books there where the actual illustrations are so powerful and so amazing, and his resilience book is in two halves and part one is all about explaining about what kind of goes wrong in life if that makes sense, and it’s kind of helps you to appreciate why we should be kind of moving forward and it’s not just about having positive affirmations, because sometimes they’re not particularly helpful. And it’s about how – there’s a brilliant, at the beginning of it, a little picture of a person going out to fight the day and they’re dressed up as an old fashioned kind of knight of the realm, so they’ve got their armour on, they’ve got their sword, they’ve got their shield and they’re just leaving an ordinary house. And so you think that you’re equipped for the day and then you turn the page and then it says, but life doesn’t always go to plan or play fair and the next picture is this terrified looking knight of the realm. And there’s this huge dragon bigger than a multistory building about to eat him, and it just shows that, you know, sometimes you can be as prepared as you think and life will throw you a curveball, and it’s kind of all about that. It’s not very thick book, it’s, let me see how many pages it is, oh it hasn’t got paid numbers. I mean, I can re-read it in about an hour, maybe an hour and half max.

Dr Nik Kendrew

And the first section, so section one, there’s one particular picture that I was reading, and it really struck a nerve with me. And it’s basically talking about how we have our show face and the picture is this very crestfallen looking chap who’s clearly struggling and a box is being delivered from somewhere like Amazon, I suppose, and it says your very own show face for all those difficult situations and it says with 20 moodifying phrases. And it’s this basically, it’s a mask, and it’s a smiling face – whew, it gets me quite emotional talking about this because it really strikes a nerve in it. In many ways, at times it feels like this is me, and phrases that are on this page. Everything’s fine. I’m great. I’m good as gold. I’m fabulous. I’m top notch. Never being better and, you know, sometimes particularly when things are really busy with work. It can be really tough to particularly front of patients. You can’t just be yourself and say I’m having a tough time. You have to kind of say, you know, because it’s about them, it’s not about you. But sometimes particularly in general practice because we see patients day in, day out and they see changes in you and  yesterday I had this patient she came in and I’ve known her for quite a long time. She’s quite elderly. She comes in with her daughter and she was saying to me, are you okay? And I was like, yeah, yeah, I’m fine. And she kind of, you know, when somebody knows you a bit better and they just dig a little bit more and she kept on saying are you sure you’re okay? I was like, yeah no I’m fine, I’m fine. And the thing is that if she kept digging a bit deeper then it might have ended up with a slightly more different outcome, you know, because when things are really tough and really busy. You do try and keep it all going, but if they press the button. Then yeah. So it is about that show face and that for me. And I was re-reading it just recently before we were chatting and that really did strike a nerve for me and also basically it just shows how powerful these kind of books are because it puts you in touch with those emotions. And then it is really quite cathartic because it’s really important to appreciate that that is how you are feeling and then to be able to then process it, and then to move forward with it. Urm what’s also really good about this book is that part two kind of gives you some ways to help you to build resilience and to go through it. And there’s one section, there’s another really powerful picture, which is in many ways kind of keys into the whole thing about plastic waste in our oceans at the moment, which is a huge problem and a huge thing that everyone’s talking about and it’s a picture. It’s a drawing. It’s a couple who are on a little rowing boat on a what looks like a lake, but it’s a very deep lake with a little duck behind them, urm and it says no swimming. And underneath them, so they can’t see this, but in the water in the very deep lake, there is kind of basically you could say it was like a strand of plastics, like a scribble. But it’s like this strand of plastic and they basically the whole of the water underneath them is just clogged up with this. Call it toxic waste and all they can see is literally a little strand just above the water. To them, it’s nothing, and the woman in the picture is pointing at it going what’s that? And the man who’s got, sat behind her, is going it’s nothing and he’s got his head in his hands and isn’t really looking properly. And it basically talks about how once we can avoid this toxic stuff we try and avoid, and it just builds up in our own personal lake, and it gets higher and higher and higher, and then it almost becomes a quagmire. You’re floating, and we don’t know what to do with it then. And again, I found that a really powerful image. So, yeah, all of those things have really, really powerful.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, that’s really interesting, because that’s exactly what Agnes Otzelberger was saying when we talked in the previous episode of the podcast about compassion fatigue and that most of us deal with the suffering that we see on a daily basis by just quashing our emotions by just sort of pushing them down and getting on, because I guess you sort of have to. It’s I guess a survival technique because if you’ve got to get through 16 patients and you know you can’t be floored by the first person that you see and then the next one and the next one. But what Agnes says is, actually, it just builds up. Putting stuff to the bottom and squashing things never really works. So I was wondering what the book says you should do about that. And what should you do about your show face? Because these, I guess, are coping strategies that are partially working for us. What’s the alternative?

Dr Nik Kendrew

Well, I mean, I think regarding the show a face. It is a case of basically realising that the amount of energy that we put into our show faces is just exhausting and anybody that has struggled with any kind of mental health problem, be it depression or anxiety, or anybody that’s struggled with things like their sexuality where they haven’t come out yet and they’ve to kind of pretend to people they’ve got this kind of what would be described as maybe a hetero normal lifestyle or a life where they’re you know they’re not gay or something like that. And all of those things are really exhausting. And so it’s a case of just realising how much energy that can zap from you. And then it’s a case of kind of accepting that and realising that the first step is to stop that show face and to speak to either your friends, or if it’s a really difficult thing, to get some professional help. To say actually, I’m not okay, but I need some help, and that’s quite liberating, because I think so many people and I’ve got a very good friend was struggling from depression, and they, even before I read this book, they were saying to me how they feel like they’re wearing a mask. And they were saying how they would go to a party and all their friends would say this guy’s the life and soul of the party and they’d come back and they’d just be absolutely exhausted, having entertained everybody for that hour and I think that’s really important for us to know as GP’s that sometimes are smiling patients in front of us are going through hell and they can still be depressed even if they’re smiling. And that’s that was a big learning point for me and it was something I didn’t really know. Well, I suppose I was aware of it, but to see, actually in black and white it’s quite interesting, and to see you  know these images that can give such a powerful emotion to it are really good and, you know, going into part two it talks about the things that you can do to help. One thing that’s really powerful and it’s literally, there’s several things in there, but it talks about it’s perfectly ok not to feel ok. The trick is not getting stuck in that. And then the other thing is to talk about is how our thoughts are so powerful. And there’s a brilliant image in here where he’s drawn somebody running out of the cinema at nighttime, popcorn going everywhere, and absolutely terrified. And it says it came from within my brain as what’s been showing on at the cinema. And it’s talking about how powerful if we, our thoughts are are, in that you know, we play these movies in our minds and we often catastrophise them and they become intrusive, repetitive, and they could be so vivid. But they are only thought when you turn the page. It says thoughts are not facts.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yes.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Take a moment to consider what this means and then tattoo it on your brain it says, which I just think is really, really powerful, because I think we can sometimes get so caught up in catastrophising and what if this happened or this happened. And it’s just really liberating just to think, actually, yes, of course, that is really important.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Dr Nik Kendrew

And it talks about all the basic stuff. Like, you know, you need to eat well, you need to, you know, exercise is really important and we talked about that ourselves, things like, you know, mindful running and even just, you know, just generally getting out there. But our elderly patients or less able patients might not. We’ll be talking about exercise, they’ll be thinking, oh I can’t do that. And so I was talking to you some MSK, muscular skeletal specialist recently and they were saying how they prescribe movement as opposed to exercise.

Dr Rachel Morris

Okay.

Dr Nik Kendrew

And just reframing it in that way is quite a useful way to do that. And also it talks about eating well, sleeping well, which we’ve talked on.

Dr Rachel Morris

So I think it’s really interesting this thoughts are not facts thing and one of the really powerful ways that I guess I teach to try and avoid stresses is working out what the story in your head is. So what’s going on in my head and then what’s actually true? Does the book give any suggestions to actually work out you know what’s actually true? To tell the truth from the thoughts that are going on in your head.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Well it doesn’t give you, um kind of exercises from that respect. I think it’s more about – because, honestly, it’s not a huge book – about flagging up these kinds of, it’s a starting point in many ways. And I think it’s helping people to realise that once you realise that your thoughts are not facts, that is liberating, but it doesn’t actually then go on to say this is what you should do about it as such. But it is talking about how, this is another diagram, another drawing here about how you should, facing your fears is quite a good thing to do, rather than just sweeping under the carpet like we’re talking about. If you challenge them and kind of, except that they are there and that, they might be a bit frightening. But if you face them, then actually they can sort of be diminished. But sometimes you might need to have a health professional to help you.

Dr Rachel Morris

I think Liz O’Riordan was talking about some really helpful books that she’s read, and I can’t remember which one it was. It might have been called Calm the fuck down. I think it was that one by Sarah Knight and that sort of goes through quite a useful way of actually interrogating your thoughts, you know, sort of, is this likely to happen?

Dr Nik Kendrew

Yes.

Dr Rachel Morris

And what’s the impact if it happens.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Yeah, and saying, I think sometimes people talk about how everything about a bad thought. It’s kind of what do you fear will happen? But what do you hope for the best? Almost, so you’re kind of, you’re challenging that just by that kind of putting it in the context of it. Just because you’re thinking it, it’s not necessarily going to come true and I think that’s quite liberating.

Dr Rachel Morris

Really interesting. So are there any other really good tips or insights that this book has brought?

Dr Nik Kendrew

Well, I mean, it is really good for our patients in that it goes through the different bits and pieces about how to, sort of lifestyle changes. So things like we were talking about earlier, so the digital detox, about breathing, exercising. It’s important to do the deep belly breathing and all that kind of thing. Sleep is really important too. It’s a really good thing for them to take away and have a read about. And it’s about, you know, things like getting negativity out of your life. One thing I found really interesting was it really does advocate gardening avid gardeners why they’re so passionate about what they do. And it’s really interesting, because there’s a beautiful diagram to go with it, and it’s basically talking about getting outside. They get some decent sun. It’s physical work. But there’s planning and forecasting and working around the seasons so they’re very much in touch with nature. And then they get the fruits of their labour. You know, they’re growing vegetables and stuff and they actually see it. So I can actually often reading that go hmm, something I should get into perhaps. I think I’ve got, in fact I’m sure I’ve actually – talking about my buying books for everything – I’m sure I’ve got a great vegetables planning book somewhere that I’ve yet to use. So that’s probably from that book. That makes sense now.

Dr Rachel Morris

I must start gardening.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Exactly.

Dr Rachel Morris

I think the thing about gardening, I have never met anyone who gardens really regularly who is massively, massively stressed, which is quite interesting. I think it really, really helps. The problem is, if you’re not a gardener, you think, you start thinking I should be gardening and a friend of mine. I came across this phrase recently, she said, we do far too much musturbation, as in I must do this. I must do that. I must do this and it makes us feel awful.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Yes.

Dr Rachel Morris

You know, I would love to start gardening, but I’m absolutely crap at it and my gardening involves going to the local garden centre twice a year, buying a load of plants, forgetting to plant them and then being yelled at by my husband for the next 12 months about being rubbish in the garden. Whereas he quite likes it. So I think it’s about finding what you already like, and you already love, and doing more of that and making sure you do more of that.

Dr Nik Kendrew

As you say, that’s exactly very interesting because that is actually said in the book as well. And it says we all had something as kids and we would literally, you know, the hours would just disappear because we were completely focused on that and often as adults we stopped doing that kind of thing, and it talks about thinking back to what it was that gave you that joy as a kid, so I think I’ll have to dig out my Star Wars figures.

Dr Rachel Morris

I think sometimes –

Dr Nik Kendrew

Is that acceptable?

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, maybe. Maybe.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Maybe not.

Dr Rachel Morris

I think for some of us, when we’ve, you know, come out the other side of having small children as well and family so busy and you know my weekends are literally taken up being a taxi service for, you know I counted the other weekend. I’d made 12 different trips out, just ferrying teenagers around, and sometimes you can’t actually remember what it is that you enjoy doing or what you, what it is that you enjoy doing now. So I’ve been trying out lots of things recently, even taking ice skating lessons with my daughter. There’s a new ice rink in Cambridge. So we said right, okay, let’s have a go. Although, she’s nine, and she’s mortified that I’m in the lesson with her and the only reason – the only way I’m allowed to do this lesson is if I stand on the other side of the ice rink and don’t speak to the entire lesson.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Wow. So are you not officially her Mother.

Dr Rachel Morris

I’m not her Mum. I said to her you know I’ll just pretend to be your sister darling, and she gave me like the most withering look I’ve ever seen.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Oh my goodness.

Dr Rachel Morris

Anyway –

Dr Nik Kendrew

So does it actually come up in conversation who you are in this lesson?

Dr Rachel Morris

No luckily.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Not yet.

Dr Rachel Morris

Not, not, not yet. So she’s  on one side being all, you know, cool and sassy. And I’m on the other side, falling over on my arse quite a lot, but anyway, I quite enjoy ice skating. That’s quite a laugh. But it’s probably not entirely my thing. But I think it’s just get out there and do some stuff. I think one way you can decide what it is that you do, is ask yourself the question, what is it that I stopped doing first when I get too busy?

Dr Nik Kendrew

Exactly. And I was thinking about that actually, with this book, particularly as it talks about things like physical activity and I probably said to you, you know, socially, that one of the first things that goes when I get stressed is going to the gym. And sometimes going to the gym is replaced by running. And when I was running for a half marathon it involved more training and was obviously not going to the gym quite so much to the point whereby I got phoned up by the gym to say, are you okay? Mortifying.

Dr Nik Kendrew

But fair enough I was running, it wasn’t as though I wasn’t doing anything. Yeah, so that is the first thing. And you know when I’m functioning really well, I will go to the gym three times a week and that will either involve cardio or swimming. One of the times when it was working the best for me, particularly with workload, and I think we’re all agreed that the moment general practice if just hideous. Yes. We’re in this kind of boiling pot, aren’t we? But we are not –

Dr Rachel Morris

You’re not gonna jump out! You’re not going to jump out, there are things you can do.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Exactly.

Dr Rachel Morris

You are not a frog.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Exactly. I’m not a frog. Yes, so well, actually I had a personal trainer for a bit, hugely expensive, and I kind of signed up for three months which was the minimal time you could sign up for, but because you’re paying for these sessions and if you missed them then you’d lose that money, you actually then prioritise going to them and come hell or high water you’ll be out the door and it’s actually really good to have something that is so important that you can’t miss it. To actually have to get to and there’s a bit of me that would love to have, you know, young kids and stuff to be able to run away from work and suddenly to go and pick them up.

Dr Rachel Morris

Hmm.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Yeah everyone else is sitting going yeah, hold on to that.

Dr Rachel Morris

You have obviously never experienced being on call and having a deadline to pick up a child from nursery.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Exactly.

Dr Rachel Morris

Oh my word.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Exactly. And yeah, I completely take my hat off, completely. And I, you know, I couldn’t do that and do you know, I’ve often come to work and think, my goodness, if I had to have, you know, no night’s sleep because I had unwell kids and then had to come to work, I would be an absolute wreck at this point in time. So anybody who’s ever done that and juggles a young family, I completely take my hat off. But there is a little bit of me that would love to have something like that. You can’t give them back though can you, that’s the problem. You can’t try it out.

Dr Rachel Morris

You can borrow some if you’d like.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Borrow some? Maybe that’s wha I’ll do.

Dr Rachel Morris

I’ve got a nine year old who likes ice skating.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Yes. Maybe we’ll do that. Yeah. So where were we going with that?

Dr Rachel Morris

Well, I’m not quite sure. But what has just –

Dr Nik Kendrew

Oh it was about gym and stuff wasn’t it.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Dr Nik Kendrew

So basically, for me, what really worked was having a personal trainer and having to drop everything and go. So I need to find something, either that again or something similar, when I literally had to drop everything.

Dr Rachel Morris

Gives you a deadline. It’s interesting. My other half is. A few years ago, him and some mates realised that as men, they weren’t really very good at meeting up with mates. They weren’t really very good at putting time in to do exercise because jobs were taking over. They started a circuit training class near them. So they just hired a hall, hired a personal trainer, and that’s been going for five or six years, and they all go, do circuits for an hour, and then they will go to pub afterwards. And it’s been really good, really good because they’re not only getting some exercise, but they’re connecting with each other.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Exactly, it’s the social stuff isn’t it, that’s what’s important.

Dr Rachel Morris

Regularly – regularly, which I think is really important. It does strike me that at the moment, GPs are pretty time poor, but possibly not so cash poor. So if you can sort of use, like you said a personal trainer is  expensive, but the benefit you get from that is remarkable. And maybe if you know that actually having dinner with another couple of friends or something is really important and usually you love to cook them dinner, but you just can’t, go out for dinner! Or just spend a little bit of money on it. My goodness, you’re working hard enough. So what can you – and I know not everybody has got disposable cash and a lot of people have got a lot of pressure on them financially. But actually, you know, it’s time. That is the biggest sort of currency at the moment, or the most previous thing. Time is the thing you absolutely can’t get back, isn’t it?

Dr Nik Kendrew

Yeah. And I think that’s something we should all remember. And, you know, life is so short and so precious and you know, when you know things happen and you lose people that are close to you when they shouldn’t have gone so soon, and that’s really tough. And  we need to make sure that we don’t have that kind of regret because you can’t get that time back.

Dr Rachel Morris

I know.

Dr Nik Kendrew

And you know, we need to work out what is important to us and make some decisions, which I sometimes feel are really tough. And, you know, you worry, or I certainly worry about how my decision might impact on other people’s workload and bits and pieces. But at the end of the day, I think the thing that brings it into perspective is maybe what would they do in that conversation? If they were in your shoes, what would they do? And I’m pretty sure they would, you know, think about themselves and make sure that they were okay. And it’s all about putting on your oxygen mask before helping other people isn’t it. You’ve got to be okay to be able to keep going and it’s a marathon it’s not a sprint. We gotta be able to keep going.

Dr Rachel Morris

100% 100%. I think it’s just worth pointing out as well. There is a lot of help available for people if they are feeling like they’re getting to the end of what they can cope with. The GP health service is a really great place to start. As a GP you can refer yourself. I think if you’re a physician, there’s a physician – oh I can’t remember what it’s called – it’s the same thing, but you have to be referred by your GP, I think. Anyway, we’ll put links in the show notes, and they have access to all sorts of things, you know, talking therapies and stuff and can get you to see consultants directly and all sorts of different things and just encourage people to take stock and get some help if they need to. Because no one else is going to do that for you. You have to do it yourself.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Exactly. The first step is actually realising that there is an issue and then talking to people. And then if that isn’t helpful, then it’s about getting the professional help, which either, you know, we all of us might need or friends might need it or, you know, people that you know that friends of friends, all that stuff, so.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah. And also I think, you know, helping each other out. And I’m sort of advocating running, you know, getting some GP peer supports going, peer support groups going in your area. I think that’s really important, or just informally, with a bunch of friends, making sure you see them regularly can be really, really, really important.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Yeah, I mean something just as straightforward as what would have been called a young practitioners group when we first started being GPs, and I don’t know what we’d change it to now –

Dr Rachel Morris

Old farts group. The people who were at university before mobile phones group.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Yes, yes, exactly. So those parts, it’s really important to do. And again, those are the kind of things that if you get really busy, tend to fall into the background, so it’s important to keep up with those.

Dr Rachel Morris

Something that struck me – James Thambyrajah, who was on the podcast the last episode or a couple of episodes before this one. He said that he started asking the questions his colleagues, not you know how are you doing? But the question is, are you okay today? That’s a really powerful question, so it gets people actually to answer properly. And maybe that just gives your colleagues a chance to take off their show face.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Exactly.

Dr Rachel Morris

And actually hit under the surface to what’s really going on.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Yeah, I think it’s really important, and we talked about it before about how powerful and important is to have a friend at work to talk to because we spend so much time at work at the moment, and I mean, where I am, the cleaner knows me quite well because I see him probably more than lots of my friends because she’s in most evenings and we have a chat and bless her she often brings me a little snack.

Dr Rachel Morris

Oh that’s so nice.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Isn’t that sweet? Oh, it’s so lovely.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Dr Nik Kendrew

You know and it’s just that little kind of kindness, little little things and also then showing appreciation for that as well, and saying thank you and stuff, it can make a rubbish day feel so much better can’t it?

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah. Yeah, so really important. So, Nik, I think we need to wrap up our inaugural self help book group episode. So just remind us of the book and who it’s by.

Dr Nik Kendrew

So the book I’ve been talking about has been the little book of resilience, how to bounce back from adversity and lead a fulfilling life, and it’s written and illustrated by Matthew Johnson, and it’s available from all good book stops, book stops? Book shops! Book stops – that would be a good thing wouldn’t it?

Dr Rachel Morris

Oh yeah, you could just go in there and read a little bit.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Fantastic.

Dr Rachel Morris

But there are book shops with cafes in which are a marvellous idea. We’ve also been talking about the headspace app, which, you know, available in all good app stores and I happen to know, or I spotted an email recently from our friends at mylocalmanager.com, who are offering a reduced rate by them for the headspace app. So that’s just a bit of intel, if you want.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Wow.

Dr Rachel Morris

It’s definitely worth knowing. So check out mylocalmanager.com for that. Nik if people wanted to contact you, how could they get hold of you?

Dr Nik Kendrew

So probably best way is on Twitter and I am @NikKendrew, so N i k k e n d r e w and yeah, so I’m around there. So follow me. I’ll follow you back most likely or interact in any way that you prefer. Yeah, good fun, it’s good fun on Twitter. Most of the time.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yes. And if anyone has a particular book they would like to discuss on the self help book group they’re very welcome to come on and be another guest. That would be great. Or just tweet us some details of books they’ve found particularly helpful that would be really good and hopefully we can bring you another episode soon. So that’s great. So thank you so much Nik –

Dr Nik Kendrew

Absolutely pleasure.

Dr Rachel Morris

– I hope you have a good rest of the day.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Thank you. And you. And yeah thanks for having me, it’s been fantastic.

Dr Rachel Morris

Great. Speak again soon. Bye bye.

Dr Nik Kendrew

Cheers, take care. Bye.

Dr Rachel Morris

Thanks for listening. If you enjoyed this episode then please do subscribe to the podcast and also please rate it on iTunes so that other people can find it too. Follow me on Twitter @DrRachelMorris and you can find out more about the face to face and online courses which I run on the youarenotafrog.co.uk website. Bye for now.

Episode 20 – A creative solution to stress with Ruth Cocksedge

In this episode, Rachel is joined by Ruth Cocksedge a Practitioner Psychologist who started her career as a mental health nurse. She practices in Cambridge and has a particular interest in EMDR for PTSD and creative writing as a way to improve mental health and wellbeing.

Episode 11 – The magical art of reading sweary books

In this episode, Rachel is joined once again by Dr Liz O’Riordan, the ‘Breast Surgeon with Breast Cancer’, TEDx speaker, author, blogger, triathlete and all round superstar who has been nominated for ‘Woman of the Year’.

Previous Podcasts.

Ways to stay in touch.

Join the community

Fill in just a few details to hear about the latest tools, services and resources designed to help GPs and others members of the Primary Care team become more resourceful and resilient in the workplace.

@ Copyright 2019 Wild Monday Resilience Ltd (Reg no 11673722)

[/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]
2020-01-10T12:56:39+00:00