Episode 18:

Help! Work is taking over my life, with Dr Jamie Wyllie

In this episode, Rachel is joined by Dr Jamie Wyllie for another Ask the Frog episode

We chat about what happens when work starts to seep into every aspect of our lives. How to create a ‘third space’ between work and home so that we get ourselves out of work mode to be fully present in parent / partner / friend mode.

We think about what we can do to stop ourselves obsessing about unfinished work and how perhaps the ‘inbox to zero’ mindset can be unhelpful when this just might not be possible.

Finally, we talk about how taking control over aspects of our time such as doing our best work at our best time and scheduling in work catch up time that is under our control just might help us to feel freer and get a better quality of life at home.

Put all your transcript content in here.

Podcast links

https://ideas.ted.com/never-take-a-bad-work-day-home-again-using-these-3-steps/

The pomodoro technique https://francescocirillo.com/pages/pomodoro-technique

Starving the Anxiety Gremlin book

Submit your questions for ‘Ask the Frog’ to rachel@wildmonday.co.uk

Sign up for downloadable CPD reflection forms plus more tools and resources

For more episodes of You are not a frog, check out our website www.youarenotafrog.co.uk and sign up to our mailing list here for loads of useful resources about thriving at work.

Follow Rachel on twitter @DrRachelMorris or LinkedIn and find out more about her online and face to face courses for doctors on surviving and thriving at work at www.shapesfordoctors.com or for other organisations at www.wildmonday.co.uk

Podcast transcript

Welcome to Episode 18 of You Are Not a Frog: Help! Work is taking over my life.

Dr Rachel Morris

Welcome to You Are Not a Frog, the podcast for GPs, hospital doctors, and other busy people in high stress jobs. Working in today’s high stress environment, you may feel like a frog in boiling water. Things have heated up so slowly that you might not have noticed the extra long days becoming the norm. You’ve got used to feeling constantly busy and are often one crisis away from not coping. Let’s face it. Frogs only have two choices: to stay in the pan and get boiled alive or to hop out and leave. But you are not a frog, and that’s where this podcast comes in. You have many more choices than you think you do. There are simple changes that you can make, which will make a huge difference to your stress levels and help you enjoy life again.

Dr Rachel Morris

I’m your host, Dr Rachel Morris, GP and executive coach and specialist in resilience at work. I’ll be talking to friends, colleagues and experts, all who have an interesting take on this so that together we can take back control to survive and really thrive in our work lives.

Dr Rachel Morris

I’d like to tell you about our new CPD forms. If you want to learn while you listen and claim CPD points, then go to the link in the show notes and sign up to receive our fully downloadable podcast CPD forms. Each one is populated with show notes and links so that you can listen, reflect, and then note down what you’re going to do. A quick, easy, and enjoyable way to do your CPD.

Dr Rachel Morris

I’m really excited about Episode 18. We have Dr Jamie Wyllie back on the podcast for another episode of Asked the Frog . Now Jamie is a portfolio GP, who lives in Great Yarmouth. He’s also a co-presenter and helps write and develop The Red Whale, Lead, Manage, Thrive course.  We talk about what to do when we feel that work is just seeping into every element of our lives. How do we attempt to get some control over it so that actually it’s not affecting every tiny bit of us. So we have a really good conversation about that.

Dr Rachel Morris

Before we head into the episode, I just wanted to tell you about a couple of things. I’m really pleased to say that we are offering resilience training for GPs, Practice Nurses, Practice Managers – every member of the primary health care team. So if you are running a training hub or a CEPN, or LMC, or a CCG and you’re looking for some resilience training for retention and support for your staff then do get in touch. We can also train up GPs to run peer groups to support each other, and we can provide support and supervision for that. We’ve also got an online course launching in March. We’ll tell you more details of that soon, but if you’d like to find out more about any of this and please do sign up to my mailing list. You can see details of that in the show notes and you’ll be the first to know about upcoming podcasts and other events that we’re running. So here’s episode 18. I hope you enjoy it.

Dr Rachel Morris

It’s really great to have Dr Jamie Wyllie back on the podcast for another episode of Asked the Frog. Good morning, Jamie.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

Good morning, Rachel.

Dr Rachel Morris

How are you today?

Dr Jamie Wyllie

Yeah not bad thank you. Not bad at all. Looking forward to Christmas.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yes. So this will be probably be going out mid to late January. So by the time everyone’s listening to this Christmas will be over, we’ll be in the new year. Wow.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

It’s a strange thought.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, there you go. So we have another question. So let me read it out. Dear You Are Not a Frog, Help! I can’t seem to leave my work at work. I work three days as a salary GP in a busy practice. The days are long. I get there at around 7:30 in the morning, and it’s not uncommon for me to be there still at 7:30 PM. The practice have recently brought me a laptop so I can dial in at home, which is helpful. But I constantly feel guilty if I’m not dialling in every day. I often have two to three hours of admin to catch up on at the weekend, and I’m beginning to resent the way that work is finding its way into every part of my life. I have another job at the CCG for one day a week and have to manage the rest of my life, including my three teenage children, on the other day. The problem is that even if I finished all my admin for the day. By the time I get home, I’m still wired. I find it difficult to relax. I feel quite tense after a long day at work, and sometimes my kids and my partner bare the brunt of this ‘work me’, which I feel is very different from the me I want to be at home. Can you help?

Dr Jamie Wyllie

It’s a very recognisable situation, isn’t it?

Dr Rachel Morris

Do we know anyone like that?

Dr Jamie Wyllie

Yeah that’ll be me.

Dr Rachel Morris

Did you write this letter?

Dr Jamie Wyllie

Help! Help! Yeah. That feels like real life doesn’t it. And there’s also stuff in there, isn’t there, about work, and about work at home, and about managing multiple jobs, and about dealing with family and the pressures of family – and also about being our best selves, both at work and at home.

Dr Rachel Morris

I do find this really hard when you’ve been engaged in something all day and then you hit home, and boom, suddenly you have to be something very different or feel very different, and half the time my head is still in work mode. How do you handle that?

Dr Jamie Wyllie

I find it really hard. I’ve sort of, almost like a mental trick. So I think about work – about putting work in a box. And so, as I drive away from work, there’s something about saying, OK, I’ve gone through my routines and my routines; the last thing I do before I walk away from the surgery is check (for those of you who are on System One, you’ll recognise this), looking at the bottom of the screen and checking that all of my particular tasks. My bloods inbox, my paperwork inbox, my tasks inbox, my patients inbox, that it’s all at zero. And then I know I can walk away. And so for me, I tend not to walk away until they’re at zero. And sometimes that leads to, as our questioner says, something that leads to staying longer than one should. Not as often as perhaps it used to for me. But partly that’s to do with the way work has changed and partly has to do with the way I’ve changed. I’m drawing harder boundaries, but yeah, I think that mental trick of saying OK, it’s at zero. I turn it off and I walk away.

Dr Rachel Morris

That is easy to do when you have got it down to zero.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

Yes.

Dr Rachel Morris

I’m thinking that there’s gonna be lots of people that never have the tasks down to zero, that never have the emails down to zero. I mean I guess some tasks, just you can’t resolve straight away because you’re waiting on results and things like that. So they’re going to be sitting around. But some emails, you just, you just don’t have time to get to everything. So what do you do if you can’t achieve that elusive zero inbox?

Dr Jamie Wyllie

That’s a really good point, because at the moment, having said I drain stuff to zero, I have left myself a coroner’s report to deal with on Christmas Eve. Because what else would you want to do on Christmas?

Dr Rachel Morris

That’s a nice cheery thing to do.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

So yeah, no, I think there’s a sort of a second mental trick for me, which is about compartmentalising life. And this is something that my wife and I talk about on a fairly regular basis. So Hillary often talks about me, yeah, about having me putting life in a box. I’ve got boxes in my head. And I don’t know that, that’s something I did consciously, but it certainly seems to reflect my reality, that work goes in its box and I do my best not to think about it. And it is that, it’s that almost deciding not to think about it, deciding not to open that box, and recognising that it doesn’t belong in my head, and I don’t give it space. That’s OK up to a point, but sometimes you’re worried about stuff, or stuff weighs on you, or you’re anxious that you made a mistake or whatever it happens to be. Um, that can be, that can be hard to cope with can’t it.

Dr Rachel Morris

So how do you do that, Jamie? How do you actually put the work away in the box when there might be things hanging over you? Or say if there’s a difficult situation, or I have a colleague who has a complaint hanging over him, and it’s quite difficult for him not to be thinking about that all the time.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

Yeah, I’d recognise that difficulty and that challenge. That sometimes stuff just weighs on us and I think it depends. I guess I would sort this into two groups of issue. One group is about just the day to day stuff of work and is about, you know, that sort of sense of worrying about tomorrow, of worrying about what’s past – of the day to day grind.  And then I would view almost as a separate thing of that experience of, I’m worried about a complaint, or I’m worried that I’ve harmed someone or I’ve done something wrong. A serious error type stuff. And I think those are two separate things. And I think that the approaches I would take would be different for the two. So I think in terms of dealing with the daily grind first because it’s something that’s easier. I think some of that is about mental discipline. But I think it’s also about the discipline of looking after ourselves, of recognising that if we drag tomorrow into today, that doesn’t make tomorrow less worrying for us.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yes

Dr Jamie Wyllie

All it means is that we worry twice.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

So that kind of sense of worrying about tomorrow, and am I gonna be able to cope, and what will it bring? And that is no productive. It’s just worry. And so something about just learning to recognise those thoughts. I mean, I guess for me these are sort of techniques and mindfulness aren’t they almost, of recognising those as thoughts and as feelings; accepting that that is, you know, they are what they are, and being kind to yourself in that moment. But also choosing not to dwell on them, not to allow them to dominate your internal world. And just practising those disciplines of choosing what we attend to and so trying to come home and choose not to attend to those thoughts. Sometimes making space is helpful isn’t it? That sort of, you know those transitional states. When I was early in my career I did a job in A&E where I was living about 45 minutes drive away from the A&E department I was working, and that ended badly, with falling asleep at the wheel.

Dr Rachel Morris

Oh my word.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

Yeah, a story for another day. But actually, up until that point, I had found it helpful that experience, of having kind of a 40 minute drive on a very thin road, without lots of traffic, without lots of decisions to make. Basically a straight road. Just that head space to get the patients out my head and get my head back into the kind of family space. So paying attention to transition moments I think could be useful as well.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, I was watching a really good Ted talk, which I’ll put in the show links, someone talking about that transition space. He calls it the third space, I sort of call it the decompression zone, where you either have, like, a little bit of time, so like you in the car or people might be commuting on a train. Or you might be walking home or you create that time yourself where you go through the transition between work and home and the speaker was suggesting some things to do. So it’s not just you sit in the car, but you almost ritualise it.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

Yes.

Dr Rachel Morris

So you sort of reflect. Firstly, you actually reflect on the day. You think what happened today, you know, what went well, what went less well, what could I do differently?  What have I got to do tomorrow? So you sort of put the day to bed as it were and then you sort of rest a bit. You sort of do something to get you out of work mode. And then you sort of consciously reset yourself. And I know, the speaker said what he did was he got home from work. He went immediately out for a walk with the dog, and possibly one or two children, you know, depending on the time of year, the time of day, and took them to the park. While the dog was running around, the children were on the playthings, he just consciously reset the day. And  he was also telling a story about another sort of very high powered executive who actually built a different entrance to his home. This was in America. I think this is where you’ve got enough space to do that sort of thing, you know, an entire different wing. And so he would park his car in the garage and then come in a different entrance, which leads straight into his bedroom so he could just consciously have a shower, sit down, maybe do 10 minutes of mindfulness and completely shake off the day and then he was ready to be completely present with his kids because he’d realised that actually, his children were starting to become frightened of him when he got home, because he must be barking orders at them and just, you know, just still in very driven work mode and that just really, really struck me as something really important for us to do. And I think, I guess that’s a little bit more healthy than just going straight to the fridge, eating cheese directly off the block of cheese and pouring yourself a large glass of wine, which I have been known to do!

Dr Jamie Wyllie

You’ve been watching me in my kitchen.

Dr Rachel Morris

There’s nothing like a massive block of cheddar. Yeah, rather large, nice in the fridge. But I don’t know. Is that something that you’ve recognised would be helpful?

Dr Jamie Wyllie

Yes, absolutely. And I think it’s about finding our own way into that. Not all of us are going be able to build a new entrance to our house. But I think just that sense of okay, let’s pay attention to those transitional spaces. Yeah, I mean, I remember when, I don’t do it these days, but I used to wear smarter clothes to work – these days I’m a jeans and scruffy shirt bloke, but even in practice – but yeah, I used to wear smarter clothes, and so there was something about coming home eeking those off, putting slobby jeans on and communicating to myself. I’m home. It’s the only thing I think I would say is that sense off being all ready to engage with the next thing and just those practises of, not just a presence but also gratefulness. I think sometimes we come home carrying baggage that our family isn’t aware off. Um so it’s easy to come home having had a difficult day and the first thing that your teenager or your spouse says to you is “Oh, I’ve had such an awful day”.Y ou kind of want to go no, no, no. You need to listen to my day. My day was harder and then you can get into that terrible competitive dizziness thing that you know. It’s just so toxic isn’t it. And you end up competing with one another trying to out difficult one another’s days, instead of actually being, you know I guess, being kind to one another, being there for one another. And so sometimes like, it’s helpful just before you walk in the door, I guess to, sort of preaching to myself here really, but just to consciously, be grateful before you walk into the family home before you re engage with the difficult teenagers before you see your spouse and all the stress that they’re carrying. Just to remind yourself, I am grateful for these people, and that’s helpful to walk back in. I’ve also tried on occasion to do that before I walk into work. I think of it as almost like a mental attitude adjustment of getting the pipe changed on my attitude and to just try and pull it back into no, this is not how I want to walk into work. Partly because this is not who I want to be at work or at home, but also because if I walk in with a bad attitude that will dictate my, you know, the next hour of my life.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah. Yeah. And gratefulness is such a quick way of getting from an anxiety mindset to a calmer mindset. I find that so many times you know, what are you grateful for in this situation. In fact, when I pick up my my nine year old daughter from school at the end of a long day, often she’s tired and she’s hungry and we’ve got a 20 minutes cycle home, and she sort of starts telling me all the bad things that happened and how her friends have annoyed her and this and the other and oh it’s just stuff. And I’ll go, darling, okay, I hear that, it’s important to hear that, but right, what went well today? What are you grateful for? And she’s like Mum! Do we have to do this? And I say yes we do, we do. So, right, we’re not gonna have any snacks when we get home until we’ve listed three things we’re grateful for. It’s a bit like gratefulness under duress. But you know what? Even when she’s doing it and doesn’t want to do it. By the time she gets to her third thing, the conversations completely changed and she’s laughing and, you know, actually focusing on what’s good and what’s gone well, so I think it’s really powerful.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

That’s right, yeah. I’m impressed that you’re managing to do it with your nine year old. That’s very much a kind of robo Mum.

Dr Rachel Morris

I have to because I’m really knackered and stressed and I’m like we’ve gotta change this conversation soon.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

Teaching those practises and self care and of learning to change your internal environment for yourself and not allowing that to dictate your future – it’s that sense of, I’ve had a bad day up to this point. But actually I do have a change moment here, and I could make it a better day from here on in, just by one or two simple things.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, and it’s learning not to catastrophise because one or two things have maybe gone wrong, or I’m feeling like this about this thing. It’s not necessarily applied to the rest of my life. And I’m dreadful for doing this when I’m feeling a bit down or low. I’m sort of saying oh this is not working, this is not, and then I apply that to the whole of the rest of my life and my partner just says Rachel stop. You know, you always do this. You sort of generalise it. But actually, if you can actually define what it is in the boundaries of that, then it’s it’s really, really helpful. When you were talking earlier about, you know, putting stuff in a box and not worrying about it. There are two I think very helpful CBT type techniques. I know that one of my children was very anxious at one point so we got this sort of, I think it was called starving the anxiety gremlin. It was really good, but they suggest this sort of worry box. So you put all these things into the worry box if you start worrying about it. And you say I will worry about these, but I’m gonna worry about them at seven o’clock this evening, and you give yourself a time when you know you’re going to go back and worry about them, and it’s really helpful because you’re not just saying right I’m just gonna stop, it’s not important enough to worry and everything, you know, it is important and I’m gonna worry about it but I’m going to do it later. And nine times out of ten you’ll get to seven o’clock and the worry will have gone, so you won’t need to. But even if it does, then you can just talk about it, or think about it for a bit and then think, well, okay, I’ve done that. And then the second technique, which I really like, is simply distract yourself.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

Yes.

Dr Rachel Morris

When you find yourself into this cycle. Just go do something go, I don’t know, do 50 star jumps or go and do the washing up or do something that maybe takes a bit more mental energy than washing up perhaps. Just to start thinking about something else, it’s quite a good, yeah, it’s pretty simple technique, but it’s helpful.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

I think that’s absolutely right, and I guess the two things that I would recognise in myself from that are cooking, because it’s something with your hands, it’s something creative and it’s a slightly different space. If my family ever listen to this podcast they will go, yeah, but you do occasionally swear at the pots and pans if they fall out the cupboard. Yepp, that’s true.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, but it’s much better getting stressed about the vegetables than it is about worrying, about what’s just gone on in your day that you can actually change.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

Swearing at the pans rather than swearing at  the family.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, exactly.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

I’m not certain they will see it as such. But secondly, yeah, that sense of distraction of maybe choosing to listen to a podcast, doing something that just takes you to a different space, different place. Yeah, I think that’s absolutely right.

Dr Rachel Morris

So the sort of second problem the questioner has is about having this admin. So not, I guess not being able to get to inbox zero and just feeling it’s hanging over them. They have to do it at the weekend or on the days when they’re supposed to be doing other stuff, you know, what advice would you give people there?

Dr Jamie Wyllie

I think the first thing that strikes me in this, is just to recognise that our questioner in this scenario is a salary GP. And so the first thing I want to be saying is that’s really interesting. The practice has given you a laptop explicitly so that you can dial in from home. Now I’m a salaried GP. The practice has given me a laptop so that I can provide excellent quality care when I am in a care home, not so that I can dial in from home. Although confession time, I do occasionally do it, not often, but occasionally. But I think there’s just for me. There’s a red flag in this scenario and that this, that our questioner has accepted an offer from the practice, which is we’d like you to use your non work time to do work. That’s an offer. It’s a proposal from the practice. Who knows how arose. Perhaps it arose from our questioner saying, I’m really struggling. How can we deal with this? Really? You know, what can you do? And this was an offer that they made, well would it help if this sort of thing. But it’s a dangerous offer, and I guess the first thing I’d want to ask our questioner is, so are the practice recognising that you are giving them home time? Is that something that’s appearing in your contract? Is it something that’s appearing in your pay packet? What’s the frame around this? That’s maybe a quite assertive place to start, but I think for me there’s something there about boundaries.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

This would be a different conversation if that individual were a partner, because I think that the boundaries there are very different. But in this scenario as a salary GP, it is legitimate to say there’s a choice that’s being made and you’ve chosen to accept the gift of a laptop in order that they have access to your home time –

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

– are you sure about that?

Dr Rachel Morris

It’s really hard though isn’t it and we discussed this a lot on the courses because, you know, often people are requesting laptops so that they can get away from work to pick up their children, for example, so they know that if they can get away by six on the dot to pick up their child, which they have to from nursery or something like that, then there’s that sort of safety valve of well, I can finish off my admin at a later date. And I mean, let’s face it, I don’t really know any GP that can fit all their work from two surgeries into four and half hours. And so are we accepting that as a salary GP doing six sessions, actually, it’s going to be more like eight sessions of actual work, and my salary is what I’m paid overall, and I’ve just got to suck up the admin. So I guess there’s two things you could do. You could either go to the practice and say, actually, you know, I don’t want to do any work at home that’s not acceptable, and my hours have to be this and I will be leaving at this time. Then probably guarantee there’s going to be some extra work left over and I don’t know how that would work, or do we just accept it and say, okay, this is just how it is and my choices are now, how many sessions do I work? Where do I work? Am I happy to do this extra work in my home time? But if I am, maybe I need to actually choose when I’m going to do it so that it’s not hanging over me all weekend.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

Yes.

Dr Rachel Morris

I don’t know, what are your thoughts?

Dr Jamie Wyllie

And I think that there’s also something about recognising that not all work is created equal and the ways in which we interact with that work changes in the time and the resource we have. What am I saying? I guess I would recognise that if I’m at work, I might choose to say, I’m going to do this, this, and this, and that for today, and that is good enough. But sometimes if I’ve recovered a bit, it’s almost like my perfectionism capacitor has recharged and is ready to discharge itself back into my life, causing chaos wherever it goes on. And so then I’m at home, and I’m like, no, I have to get this inbox to zero. Ok that’s interesting. If you’ve been at work, you would have left with the inbox at zero based on the bloods that had come in up to, call it half five or six. But now here you are, eight at night and you’re gonna do 10 more bloods because they’ve come in. And you say well it’s only 10 bloods what’s the big deal? Well, okay, but that’s a choice you’re making. If you choose to say it’s only 10 bloods, what’s the big deal,  you are choosing to do that additional discretionary work. You might legitimately say, well, I’m not gonna do those bloods today. I’m reining in that perfectionism, that tendency to want everything to zero and everything done perfectly.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, and I would argue, actually, that if you’re doing it at 8, 9, 10 o’clock at night and you’ve had a day at work, you’re going to be so inefficient anyway.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

Yes.

Dr Rachel Morris

Because the evidence says, I think that we’ve probably got 8 to 10 hours of work in us per day. Then after that, you might as well not be there because your productivity and efficiency just go down massively.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

I do think it’s worth our questioner asking themselves, when are they most productive? Because again, I know this is an example of something I use on the courses that we teach – that recognising that for myself, what I used to do is to do my bloods at the end of the day. Now I do them at the very beginning of the day. Since we’ve merged with another surgery, they have a slightly different culture and they do their bloods all through the day, whereas the way we used to organise it was, you do your bloods until the base of the box is empty and then you walk away. Because the box was emptied at the beginning of the day. It will be emptied again at the beginning of tomorrow. Okay, yes. At the end of the week walk out to an empty box, but that, just that sense of doing it when you’re at your cognitive brightest, the tasks which will take you longest do first kind of thing. Otherwise, what you find is that bloods which you could deal with in half an hour, take an hour and 10 minutes of worry and fritting about in the record. And doing all that kind of stuff instead of getting them done quickly, you end up doing slowly when you’re tired.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

So you may be better to choose to transfer that task into a brighter moment. Say well ok, I am going to give them some of my home time, but that home time is gonna be between half six and seven when I’ve got coffee next to me and I’m in my jammies. I’m gonna blaze through them when nobody else in the house is awake. Then I’ll go and have a shower and go to work.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, it’s about being in control, isn’t it? And feeling, actually, this is when I have chosen to do this, and this is when I’m going to do it, so it just doesn’t bleed out into other things and time always – sorry it’s not time – tasks always expand to fill the time allocated. I definitely have found that. And I think the point about doing your best work at your best time is really important. And I certainly teach this in my shapes tool kit courses because a lot of us first thing in the morning, what do we do? We deal with emails. We sort of turn on our computer and the first that we do is look at emails and sort them out. Actually, emails are a very low quality task. So emails are the sorts of things you can do while you’re being interrupted by other people asking you stuff because each email may take a minute, up to five minutes to answer, you could be interrupted. Whereas if you’re maybe writing a report or doing a project or doing something that takes deep thought, yeah, absolutely do it when you’re at the best. And most people are at their best first thing in the morning. There are some people that are better – the best at the evening and you will know who you are. But most people are and I’ve started to do this now, is actually say right, what am I gonna do first in the morning before I’ve even checked my emails? I’ll work on that project or that presentation or that piece of content that I want to do. In fact, we’re doing this podcast first thing in the morning aren’t we because I think it’s a really productive time to do it. And the best time to really get the best out of people. So paying attention to when you’re doing stuff. And also, I had Dr Gandalf on the podcast a few episodes ago and he was giving us some really useful productivity hats. And one of the things he said was to batch things. So absolutely do all your bloods at the same time. Don’t just do them in dribs and drabs as they come in through the day. You’ll do them so much quicker if you just do them all at once, and if you go through all your documents all at once. Go through your emails all at once. So don’t just chop and change between tasks all the time as far as possible, obviously, if you’re on call it’s slightly different, isn’t it?

Dr Jamie Wyllie

I think it is. But even then you can try to do one task at a time. Yeah, I think not allowing yourself to get bogged down in a task. I think it’s – I experience that my best work sometimes occurs when I’m under pressure. Sometimes using that, that trick Pomodoro technique, which I’m not massively a fan off, but it does have a, but that idea that you’d use short bursts almost like, almost like mini sprints inside the day, you’d say, well, okay, I’m going to do 25 minutes on the bloods now.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yes, so the Pomodoro technique for the people who don’t know is where you allocate your time into 25 minute slots and then have a five minute break. It’s called Pomodoro because I think the person that devised it had one of those tomato timers. So, only 25 minutes. So therefore they called it the Pomodoro technique.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

I didn’t know that.

Dr Rachel Morris

There you go. Well, did you never think why on earth is it called the Pomodoro technique?

Dr Jamie Wyllie

No, it didn’t occur to me.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, there you go. So, I think something about planning your day, planning your time and for this person who’s just feeling that the work is going into every bit of their life, it may well be that just allocating a couple of hours on their day off when they know they’ve got time to spend on quality work, you know, put on your favourite music, have a nice cup of tea or go to a nice cafe and do it and then plan something nice after you’ve done it. Will, just maybe stop them from staying extra late after their really long days at work, or stop them thinking, oh, I just need to do this in the evening, because you know you’ve got that slot booked in. You know, you can probably just pummel through loads and loads of stuff then and then that will leave the weekend free.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

Yes, that sense of freedom, of okay, I will do what I need to do. I’ll do it inside this time span and then I am free. I’ve earned my freedom.

Dr Rachel Morris

But a lot of us just do things in dribs and drabs don’t we rather than actually sitting down and planning it out and accepting it. It’s interesting. I think it was the same Ted talk that talked about this sort of third space way of getting your head out of work and into home life. He said, a lot of people say that they want more life outside of work, but actually when they’ve done the research, it’s not that people want an increased quantity of time outside work. They want a better quality of time outside work. I think that’s so true, because we actually do have more time than we think we do but often we sort of spend it just lying around, thinking about what we need to do or what we haven’t done and sort of frittering away the time.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

Yes.

Dr Rachel Morris

But actually being really intentional about how we use our time off as well as how we use our time at work is really important I think.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

I think that’s right and I think also I guess what occurs to me thinking about that is also the the subtle ways in which frittering at the ends of days destroys the next day’s productivity. So the 45 minutes to an hour of watching crap telly after 10 p.m.

Dr Rachel Morris

I never do that, Jamie, you know me. Definitely not Love Island. That’s the highlight of my week.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

But – which is fine. But in that case, you know, watch it on demand. Doing it at the end of the day when you’re exhausted and you’re kind of somehow trying to claw back some relaxation or reward from the day that you’ve felt wrung out and empty by, actually it’s far better to say, okay, I’m done with today, I’m gonna go to bed, read a book and turn the light out 45 minutes earlier than I normally would. You will have a far better day tomorrow than if you have just, you know, that extra gin and tonic and maybe watch a bit crap telly. And before you know it, it’s midnight, and you’re gonna be exhausted the next day and a little bit hungover.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

Kinda just just recognising, okay, today’s been a challenge. I’m going to walk away from that rather than frittering at the end of the day.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah. So any other top tips before we wrap up this episode?

Dr Jamie Wyllie

I guess I just want to kind of flag that we talked about two different sorts of ways in which work can erode our lives. We haven’t addressed the question of, what if what’s eroding is worry about a significant error, or about significant events, or about big, big things; worry about conflict in the partnership, worry about challenging colleagues, whatever it happens to be. Not just the – we talked a lot about the day to day erosion. But sometimes there are bigger things. I think they need different strategies.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

I don’t think what we’ve been talking about will necessarily deal with them. And maybe we should just address on another podcast?

Dr Jamie Wyllie

Yeah.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

Recognise that that’s a separate question. But I guess I wanna wave a flag to those people struggling with that. Something about getting support, about finding friends that you can share with, who understand, and who will support you through that. Thinking about using mindfulness and also actually think it might actually be about reflective writing; the way of trying to get the difficult stuff, the big, difficult stuff – you don’t need to do a piece of reflective writing on a busy day that had too many patients, and too many bloods, and too many papers, and too much of everything. That’s just a busy day. It’s okay. What we’ve talked about is how to deal with that, but for the big stuff, taking a more deliberate approach.

Dr Rachel Morris

And I think if there is big stuff going on, just be aware that there’s a little red flag waving and go, okay, there’s this stuff going on for me now, probably now is not the time to take on a lot of extra work, or start something really big that’s going to take up a lot of my time. I need to look after myself a bit now, and I need to search out those things that will be helpful. So I think, like you mentioned connection with other people and talking things through really, really important. So you know, just to say be kind to yourself if you’re going through something that’s taking up a lot of head space, and it’s often things outside of work as well as stuff inside of work – worries about children, being in a difficult relationship, all those sorts of things. And sometimes getting some therapy or you know, actually talking to a counsellor or something like that could be really, really helpful as well.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

Yes.

Dr Rachel Morris

Let’s talk about that on another podcast. We’ll get you back for another one.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

I guess you have plenty of room to talk about that.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, absolutely. But thank you so much Jamie for all your wise words. That’s been really helpful – lots of food for thought there. And if any of our listeners have a dilemma that they’d like us to discuss then please, either email me at rachel@wildmonday.co.uk. Or you can direct message me on Twitter, which is, I’m @DrRachelMorris. Or you can join my Facebook group, which is The Shapes Collective and we can have a discussion. But please just let us know any queries, any issues you’ve got, and we will try and discuss them here. That would be great. Brilliant.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

Fantastic.

Dr Rachel Morris

So Jamie, have a really good day.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

Thank you, Rachel. You too.

Dr Rachel Morris

Okay, speak soon. Bye.

Dr Jamie Wyllie

Bye now.

Dr Rachel Morris

Thanks for listening. If you’ve enjoyed this episode then please do subscribe to the podcast and also please rate it on iTunes so other people can find it too. Do follow me on Twitter @DrRachelMorris, and you can find out more about the face to face and online courses which I run on the youarenotafrog.co.uk website. Bye for now.

Episode 20 – A creative solution to stress with Ruth Cocksedge

In this episode, Rachel is joined by Ruth Cocksedge a Practitioner Psychologist who started her career as a mental health nurse. She practices in Cambridge and has a particular interest in EMDR for PTSD and creative writing as a way to improve mental health and wellbeing.

Episode 20 – A creative solution to stress with Ruth Cocksedge

In this episode, Rachel is joined by Ruth Cocksedge a Practitioner Psychologist who started her career as a mental health nurse. She practices in Cambridge and has a particular interest in EMDR for PTSD and creative writing as a way to improve mental health and wellbeing.

Episode 20 – A creative solution to stress with Ruth Cocksedge

In this episode, Rachel is joined by Ruth Cocksedge a Practitioner Psychologist who started her career as a mental health nurse. She practices in Cambridge and has a particular interest in EMDR for PTSD and creative writing as a way to improve mental health and wellbeing.

Episode 20 – A creative solution to stress with Ruth Cocksedge

In this episode, Rachel is joined by Ruth Cocksedge a Practitioner Psychologist who started her career as a mental health nurse. She practices in Cambridge and has a particular interest in EMDR for PTSD and creative writing as a way to improve mental health and wellbeing.

Episode 20 – A creative solution to stress with Ruth Cocksedge

In this episode, Rachel is joined by Ruth Cocksedge a Practitioner Psychologist who started her career as a mental health nurse. She practices in Cambridge and has a particular interest in EMDR for PTSD and creative writing as a way to improve mental health and wellbeing.

Episode 11 – The magical art of reading sweary books

In this episode, Rachel is joined once again by Dr Liz O’Riordan, the ‘Breast Surgeon with Breast Cancer’, TEDx speaker, author, blogger, triathlete and all round superstar who has been nominated for ‘Woman of the Year’.

Previous Podcasts.

Ways to stay in touch.

Join the community

Fill in just a few details to hear about the latest tools, services and resources designed to help GPs and others members of the Primary Care team become more resourceful and resilient in the workplace.

@ Copyright 2019 Wild Monday Resilience Ltd (Reg no 11673722)

2020-01-23T23:12:29+00:00