Episode 20:

A creative solution to stress with Ruth Cocksedge

In this episode, Rachel is joined by Ruth Cocksedge a Practitioner Psychologist who started her career as a mental health nurse. She practices in Cambridge and has a particular interest in EMDR for PTSD and creative writing as a way to improve mental health and wellbeing.

We chat about EMDR and how it can help with PTSD, and discuss some antidotes to anxiety and stress such as mindfulness and self-compassion. So much of how we feel is a result of our own self-talk and learning to be kind to ourselves and treat ourselves how we would treat our best friend will help alleviate anxiety.

We discuss how Ruth discovered creative writing as a way to good mental wellbeing and her journey into teaching creative writing for wellbeing. Learning and playing is one of the ways to wellbeing and anything which helps us get into flow and express what we are thinking and feeling can be extremely powerful in relieving feelings of stress and anxiety.

Ruth’s top tips:

1)      Be kind to yourself

2)      Recognise you are human

3)      Treat yourself how you would treat your best friend

Extra info:

Ruth plans to run a Creative Writing for Well-being group for six weeks in the Spring. This will run on a Saturday morning or an evening for 2 hours in Cambridge, start date to be confirmed. Course aim: to improve the well-being of participants by giving them opportunities to write creatively and develop their ability to express themselves in writing, for enjoyment, personal development and to tell their stories.

Do email Ruth for more information and to express an interest.

Put all your transcript content in here.

Podcast links

Mindfulness meditations from Jon Kabat-Zinn https://www.mindfulnesscds.com

Breaking and mending by Joanna Cannon https://www.amazon.co.uk/Breaking-Mending-doctors-stories-compassion/dp/1788160576/

Find out more about Ruth http://www.cambridgecbt.com/our-therapists/ruth-cocksedge/

Contact Ruth ruth.cocksedge@icloud.com

Sign up to hear about new episodes of the podcast and for downloadable CPD reflection forms plus more tools and resources

For more episodes of You are not a frog, check out our website www.shapesfordoctors.com/podcasts and sign up to our mailing list here for loads of useful resources about thriving at work.

Follow Rachel on twitter @DrRachelMorris or LinkedIn and find out more about her online and face to face courses for doctors on surviving and thriving at work at www.shapesfordoctors.com or for other organisations at www.wildmonday.co.uk

Support the show (https://wildmonday.us19.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=885e158d10911ad80f467f60c&id=d2391396fa)

Podcast transcript

Welcome to Episode 20 of You Are Not a Frog: A Creative Solution to Stress.

Dr Rachel Morris

Welcome to you are not a frog, the podcast for GPs, hospital doctors, and other busy people in high stress jobs. Working in today’s high stress environment, you may feel like a frog in boiling water. Things have heated up so slowly you might not have noticed the extra long days becoming the norm. You’ve got used to feeling constantly busy and are often one crisis away from not coping. Let’s face it. Frogs only have two choices: to stay in the pan and get boiled alive or to hop out and leave. But you are not a frog – and that’s where this podcast comes in. You have many more choices than you think you do. There are simple changes that you can make, which will make a huge difference to your stress levels and help you enjoy life again. I’m your host, Dr Rachel Morris, GP and executive coach and specialist in resilience at work. I’ll be talking to friends, colleagues, and experts – all who have an interesting take on this so that together we can take back control to survive and really thrive in our work lives.

Dr Rachel Morris

I’d like to tell you about our new CPD forms. If you want to learn while you listen and claim CPD points, then go to the links in the show notes and sign up to receive our fully downloadable podcast CPD forms. Each one is populated with show notes and links so that you can listen, reflect, and then note down what you’re going to do. A quick, easy, and enjoyable way to do your CPD.

Dr Rachel Morris

Welcome to Episode 20. So before we get started, just a reminder that if you’d like to have regular updates about the podcast and if you’d like some more resources about thriving and being happy at work, then do sign up for our mailing list. We’ll be able to give you discounts, news about events, and also we’ve got a brand new online course and community launching very soon. If you’d like to know more about it, make sure you’re on our mailing list. You can sign up on the show links below, and if you click on the link for CPD forms, you can also sign up there.

Dr Rachel Morris

Now I first met Ruth through a mutual friend in Cambridge and we were talking about creative writing because Ruth is just, of course, learning to teach creative writing. And she started to use it in a therapeutic manner to help people with stress and wellbeing. I thought it’d be really interesting for us to hear about how that works and also pick her brains about some of the therapies that she does. Here we are. So it’s really great to have with me on the podcast Ruth Cocksedge. Now Ruth is a practitioner psychologist. She started a career as a mental health nurse and she now practises in Cambridge, really sort of general psychology, but she has a particular interest in EMDR, which is the recommended treatment for PTSD and also works with a lot of professionals experiencing stress in their work and in their lives. And I thought it’d be really great for us just to hear from her some top tips really to keep ourselves mentally fit and well and things that we can do for ourselves, but also the sort of help that we can access it if we need to. So Ruth, welcome to the podcast.

Ruth Cocksedge

Thank you.

Dr Rachel Morris

Really, really great to have you here. So first of all Ruth, what sorts of things do you typically deal with in your practice?

Ruth Cocksedge

Well, it – mainly the general stuff that GP’s see, so people with anxiety, various anxiety disorders and depression, occasionally I see people with eating disorders as well. And we were talking about EMDR just then in people with trauma, in their childhoods or in their recent lives. Often there’s a kind of pattern of trauma over time and people with, you know, childhood difficulty. I mean, we all have a particular childhood that leaves us with some aftermath that shapes us as people. But if it has kind of held people back or interfered with their functioning in their adult lives, you know, there’s a lot that can be done to address those things and how they move forward in a positive way.

Dr Rachel Morris

Great. So I’m really interested in EMDR. So what does that stand for?

Ruth Cocksedge

It’s Eye Movement Desensitisation Re-processing therapy, which is a horrible mouthful, which is why we shorten it to the acronym. It was developed by a psychologist in the States called Francine Shapiro, it was a sort of accidental finding about how she managed to address something traumatic in her own life whilst taking a walk through the park when she was moving her eyes from side to side, and she was – ended up feeling much better, and she investigated this and developed a therapy from it. I mean it sounds, you know, it was one of those fortuitous kind of events from which something has you know emerged really usefully.

Dr Rachel Morris

How does it work, then?

Ruth Cocksedge

Well, there are various theories about that. I tend to be fairly sceptical about them. I think there’s still a lot we don’t understand. But there’s something about the stimulus abusing your eyes whilst you’re going through a memory in your mind that takes up some of your attention, or you’re working memory, which allows the brain somehow to process the difficult trauma. Because of course what happens when people remember very traumatic things is there Amygdala gets activated and they re experience the – all the stress hormones and the difficult feelings they had when they were going through the experience. So trauma memories are laid down slightly differently and the amygdala gets activated. So somehow – and that of course, happens when people go through it so often they avoid it. And these things are, you know, they’re re-experiencing symptoms, and the avoidance are you know, markers of PTSD. But if you can get them to a place where they can think about the memory whilst this other stimulus is going on, that it allows the brain to process very adaptively. It’s a similar mechanism that till the one that’s used with trauma focus CBT and other types of trauma therapy. They have this in common, this re processing element, but with the added ingredient for EMDR is this alternative stimulus, which does in my experience, you know, allow things to be processed more swiftly and in a slightly different way. And for people to find they can, you know, that the distress diminishes in a session and they are able to kind of get a very new perspective on what happened to them. You know, I survived or yeah, you know, I’m not a bad person. It was somebody else’s fault – you know what happened?

Dr Rachel Morris

So does it have to be eye movements? Or could it be any other –

Ruth Cocksedge

There could be other kinds of stimulus, so it can be buzzers in the hands. It could be taps. The therapist can tap the person’s knees on either side. You can have clicks in your ear.

Dr Rachel Morris

Wow.

Ruth Cocksedge

Sometimes more than one method, particularly when the, you know, trauma, the activation of the distress in a session is very, very marked.

Dr Rachel Morris

Right. So it’s really helping people to process the trauma in a way which they’re not gonna completely be reliving it all the time.

Ruth Cocksedge

Yeah.

Dr Rachel Morris

They can store it away and remember it in a non traumatic fashion?

Ruth Cocksedge

That’s right. It becomes part of their autobiographical memory. And the – erm, yeah so the memory becomes part of the autobiographical memory. They can remember it without distress. And you can often tell that this has been affective because they’ll come back and they’ll say, the next time you see them, you know, I haven’t thought about it. Or if I thought about it, I haven’t had a, you know, really panicky sensation or – and I haven’t avoided thinking about it, I’ve been able to think about it. Or I haven’t had any more nightmares about those things, really very – clinically very convincing, you know, for a therapist to hear that. Something has really changed.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, well, that’s amazing isn’t it? I remember when we met for coffee. You were saying to me, it’s really changed your practise from what you were doing, say 15-20 years ago. It’s a really different technique, and you’re getting really good results with it.

Ruth Cocksedge

Yeah, yeah, that’s right. So often, you know, be used in my practice before the EMDR to be treating an anxiety disorder using the CBT kind of models and methods. And they work and they’re affective, but in this way you can find a – you know, significant moments that led to the anxiety disorder and then you can treat those using the EMDR. So it’s like we can still do the CBT. I would say I combine the approaches.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah. Yeah that’s fascinating. And have you sort of dealt with any, any doctors or health care professionals who have experienced trauma from their jobs at all?

Ruth Cocksedge

Do you know? I don’t think I have actually. I think I have treated one or two doctors with OCD kind of experience. You know, when they’re doing clinical interventions taking bloods or something like that, they can have very high levels of stress, and then we can do some EMDR with that. So if you’re like that. Yeah, it’s a form of that, but it’s through a specific anxiety disorder, I’d say.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Ruth Cocksedge

I think I’m probably not linked into the kind of referral sources that might send – who’s been through, you know, a huge event, you know, at work. I’ve obviously treated people who have experienced medical trauma, hospital trauma, you know, the blanket term, you know?

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah. Yeah. So I know that you often see professionals who are in high stress jobs who are dealing with a lot of stress and anxiety. What sort of pathway do they have to go through to try and sort of get better?

Ruth Cocksedge

Ooh gosh. That’s a big question. Well, I think one thing for those kinds of professionals is kind of admitting they have a problem and that they need some help. That’s a huge big step. And often they’ve had to take that on their own. But they might have been, you know, how to, you know, finally had a chat to a colleague or a senior colleague and said, actually, I’m really struggling here, and they made a recommendation. They might have gone through, for example, locally, they might come through the – there’s a service, I think at the medical school possibly – I’m not sure whether that’s for the hospital doctors or if it’s only the medical students – where they, you know, an assessment happens with a psychiatrist who’s employed there and they’ll make a recommendation.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, I think it’s direct access. Yeah.

Ruth Cocksedge

Yeah.

Dr Rachel Morris

So, as a practising psychologist, what advice would you have for people who are experiencing sort of quite high levels of stress on a day to day basis, in terms of protecting themselves and dealing with it more holistically or dealing with it more healthily, I guess?

Ruth Cocksedge

Yeah. I think that there’s something about accepting that they’re only human, you know, they are huge numbers of pressures we put on ourselves about – and I certainly did this earlier in my career – you know, if I’m going to treat people for difficulties then I need to be dealing with my own. Well, somehow, whatever that means and actually, it’s much more about recognising that life happens and we’re only human and we have to – you can find a way through that by being kind to ourselves, really, by accepting it and saying yeah, you know, this is my limit. I’m not Superman. I’m not superhuman. I think the medical profession is can be quite bad at that. Recently read an amazing memoir – I can’t remember if I told you about it when we spoke before – by a psychiatrist called Joanna Cannon. It’s called Breaking and Mending and she went into medicine late after her own adverse and somewhat deprived childhood I think – she doesn’t say too much about that in the book – but she certainly went into it late and without having finished her school education. So she had to do an access course and so on. She managed to find someone to give her a place at a medical school and you know she writes very candidly about how that impacted on her as a person and what was expected of her and how junior doctors, for some newly qualified are treated really badly. I’m not sure if it’s still the case. She was obviously talking about 15-20 years ago, but I’m sure it is in places where you know you’re – there’s very little sympathy for the human impact of what you’re doing. So that, I think, is where people can be kinder to themselves. And not so much expect less, because we know we need to have high standards for health care, but you know, when it doesn’t work out, you know you’re only human. I’m obviously not talking about, you know, I don’t know medical accidents and those which have to be investigated and addressed, and we have to learn from them as individuals and as a group. But, you know, it’s that sort of recognising that, you know, we all have our limitations. I think there’s a whole genre, actually, of memoirs by doctors and other professionals about what it’s like, really like, on the inside. All the mistakes I’ve ever made kind of thing, you know? They’re just with it and we make them all the time.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, there’s that one by Henry Marsh isn’t there? The neurosurgeon?

Ruth Cocksedge

Yes.

Dr Rachel Morris

Henry Marsh?

Ruth Cocksedge

Yes. I think that’s his name.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, but we still do beat ourselves up when we make mistakes, because they can have a significant impact. And I mean, luckily, most of them don’t. But I still remember, you know, times when luckily, a pharmacist has picked up an error that I’ve made, and it didn’t go out, and I think all of us could go there – but for the grace of God, go aye.

Ruth Cocksedge

Yeah.

Dr Rachel Morris

When we do make these mistakes, it’s one thing to say to us and us our heads, yeah we’re only human. That’s fine. We still feel dreadful. What can we do about that?

Ruth Cocksedge

Yeah, I mean in a way we can’t avoid feeling all that, especially when we are, you know, really trying to do a very good job. You know, we’re not sort of just dismissing it or ignoring it. There is something about compassion I think that’s involved, you know, there is – we have to be, you know, learning to be compassionate to ourselves. There’s a whole load of  work that’s been done on compassionate mind theory by a psychologist, Paul Gilbert, which is based on a neuro scientific theory and obviously research what we know about how the brain works kind of thing. But often our sort of nurturing side of us is under used and underestimated, and we obviously we have it, because we need to bring up our children because, you know, they don’t grow to maturity inside us; we have these big, complicated brains and all the rest of it, so they need lots of nurturing and care. So we’ve developed all the side of that and all the hormones and all the brain systems that go with that. But often we don’t apply that to ourselves. What we apply is our drive, you know, to get things done, to feed the family, to do a good job, and so we can beat that, you know, beat ourselves up. And we can activate our own threats systems by saying it’s not good enough! You’ll never be any good and things like that. But actually, just, you know, mistakes don’t mean will never be any good for example or whatever. And there are ways of developing self compassion which are, you know, hard to do for professional people. It’s like it know. I must do more. I must get on. I want to, you know, I’ve got goals. I’ve got ambitions. But actually, we also need too be kind to ourselves.

Dr Rachel Morris

So what are some of those ways of developing self compassion? What do you recommend to your clients?

Ruth Cocksedge

Well, in one way, that’s very sort of specific is mindfulness actually. It’s not everybody thing and sometimes you know we have to just kind of you know, dip our toe in even if we’re a bit sceptical about it, because it’s about just being able to be with yourself. And actually, if you do develop a little bit of facility with it and you can find it, really, what’s the right word? It’s a real way of supporting yourself. There’s a lovely guy called John Kabat-Zinn, who writes – he was one of the guys who started the mindfulness, the health kind of movement, physical health, and it’s being developed for mental health as well since then. But – so he talks about when – if you listen to one of his guided meditations, you know, thank yourself for giving yourself this time to look after yourself. So you know when I practise mindfulness, which isn’t very often, cause I’m not very good, you know, kind of at being regular about the practise. It’s, you know, you can feel like you done something really worthwhile, even though all you’ve done is sit on a chair for 10 minutes.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah. Yeah. So these mindful practises, particularly ones where you sort of thanking yourself and expressing kindness to yourself are helpful. Is there anything else that you could suggest?

Ruth Cocksedge

So I’m not a compassion therapist okay, so I’ve only dipped into it and drawn on it. So there are some more specific ways, for those people who practise that as a kind of main way of working. But certainly you know the traditional CBT ways of looking at what is the content of yourself, what are you saying to yourself? And saying well, you know, I’m thinking about what that means and what’s you know, other ways of thinking about yourself. So, I mean, one classic way of doing this is to say, well what would you say, say to somebody else who’s having the same problem?

Dr Rachel Morris

Yes.

Ruth Cocksedge

Ooh, well, I’d say they need a break or you know, maybe to do something nice for themselves because they’ve had a hard time or whatever, but we don’t do that for ourselves. We’re harsher on ourselves by in large. So, you know, think that’s shift in perspective that we go for in CBT is really useful in terms of activating that the kindness to yourself. If you’d say to a friend bad lark and, you know, take it easy or you need a break or whatever. Then why do we not say that to ourselves?

Dr Rachel Morris

That’s the –

Ruth Cocksedge

You can. And we can learn to do it as well.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah. Yeah. I was gonna say that’s a really good coaching question that I use quite a lot of the time as well.

Ruth Cocksedge

Is it?

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.  So you know –

Ruth Cocksedge

What’s that?

Dr Rachel Morris

What advice would you give yourself? Oh sorry. Not yourself. What advice would you give someone else?

Ruth Cocksedge

Yes.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, and it really unlocks things. You can go ooh, well, I’d say this and that, and don’t be daft, and you’re only human, and I say right. And they go, ahhhh, and that’s a ahh-haa moment for people a lot of the time. Yeah. Why am I treating myself like that? It’s just, it’s just crazy. We are our own worst enemies a lot of the time aren’t we?

Ruth Cocksedge

Yeah. And the people who go on from that to say yes, but I don’t deserve it, and you know, I’m not like everybody else. You know, I’m a bad person, you know, those the ones with the more severe kind of difficulties.

Dr Rachel Morris

Okay.

Ruth Cocksedge

So you might need some more – more work and psychotherapeutic work on that, if you’d like.

Dr Rachel Morris

Okay. Okay. So you’re really finding it difficult to say that to yourself maybe then get – go and access some more help.

Ruth Cocksedge

Yeah.

Dr Rachel Morris

Interesting. So Ruth I know that you’re really interested in creative writing and how that can help with wellbeing and help with managing stress and stuff. Can you just tell me a bit about that?

Ruth Cocksedge

Well, if I tell you how I sort of came to do – I suppose I’ve always been interested in it since a child, and you know, writing English compositions, as we used to in my day, and always enjoyed that. So I have a couple of times thought about – tried out you know, writing for myself. So when I left the NHS a few years ago, I treated myself to some creative writing courses and I found it, you know, much more life affirming and enhancing for myself than I expected. So – and there are a number of aspects to it, but just getting – being off the hook of having to justify everything I do to commissioners, or to colleagues, or to the powers that be in the NHS about, you know, we’re doing this because there’s an evidence based for it and this is it, you know, here’s the reference, you know, this is the rationale for doing this, that’s why this is good practise and so on.  I can just say, oh, I don’t have to do any of that. What a relief. I can just make up a story and say whatever I like, however ridiculous or whatever and I’ve found that enormously liberating and enjoyable. And you know, and getting the feedback on it from other people about what they make – and getting positive feedback – obviously not universally and exclusively positive because I had lots to learn about how to write well and still do. But there’s a sort of side of it, which is about the impact of the writing. So if somebody is directly in a small group of people writing about something and, you know, talking about their own experience, for example, or a version of their own experience that’s fictional, then you know the impact that can have on people, because they’re hearing it directly from you. It’s not like the same as writing a book reading a book. Yeah, so the feedback is enormously part of that. You don’t have to be a good writer if you like to have an impact on people in a creative writing group, it has its own kind of life I think.  So that’s you know, two parts of really expressing yourself in the writing and then, you know, interacting with other people about what, what they’ve made of that. What – how it speaks to them. I mean, it’s another step again, to then write it well for publication, you know.

Dr Rachel Morris

And I’m hearing that actually, almost just doing something for the sake of doing it, rather than to achieve a goal or to –

Ruth Cocksedge

Yes.

Dr Rachel Morris

– cure someone or to – is that quite therapeutic for you?

Ruth Cocksedge

Yeah, it’s a kind of, it’s a form of play, you know, taking you back to oh yeah, let’s do something fun, you know, let’s throw a ball around, let’s throw some words around, lets, you know,  doing that – I think it’s similar if you think about things like art therapy or drama therapy, these are the other sort of creative arts, if you like, that can be used therapeutically, though as – following on from my creative writing courses, I have recently taken a Post PG Cert up at – continuing education at the university in Cambridge on teaching creative writing, which I didn’t think I really wanted to do. But until I found out that there is a therapeutic element to that, and then I thought, yes, I want to do that. So being able to – give them the opportunity to express themselves and use any kind of prompts and poems and objects that might mean something to them and just, you know, photographs, for example, or something that might remind them of something in their past and helping them to just just do a little bit of writing about it in a class, share it with one another, and then, you know, that might lead to something else. Or it might just be useful for its own sake and my experience of running a couple of courses in that has borne that out really, you know, people really do find it liberating in the way that I did yeah.

Dr Rachel Morris

Did you learn anything on that course to teach it that really surprised you?

Ruth Cocksedge

Well, I – one of the things that I used the opportunity to do, because it was an academic course, of course, was to look at how we use writing in psychological therapies and various ways, and that I found really helpful to sort of – it’s the kind of link for me between my day job if you like, the writing bit and yeah, yeah. I mean, there’s quite a few ways that we can use it. And one of them is the expressive writing method, which is from a guy called James Pennebaker in the States who’s done, it has a very small effect size from a lot of studies. But it’s very consistent that if we do right and express our feelings on paper, even if we don’t even read it again, it has measurable health benefits for people.

Dr Rachel Morris

Right.

Ruth Cocksedge

So you can’t, you know, it’s that – that’s really useful to know. And to maybe, even just suggesting, well have you thought about writing about this? And you know, whether that be, you know, an experience of illness, if you’re a health professional, or whether that be, you know a job challenge, or you know something from your childhood – whatever I think a difference, it could make a measurable difference.

Dr Rachel Morris

That is interesting because I, you know, in medicine, we’re told to reflect all the time on everything, you know, you do something you’ve got to reflect. You’ve got to submit it for portfolio.  You know, when you’re training, you’ve got to submit portfolio reflections all the time. I’m a tutor for the PG Cert in medical education at  Maddingly Hall and for Cambridge University and large elements of the assessments of the essays is reflecting what they did, which is incredibly powerful and incredibly useful and I think sometimes we can get a bit bored of reflecting or get a bit jaded, but oh I’ve got to reflect again. But in my experience, I remember you know, a couple of times when the day has gone really badly, and I’m really worried about something, sometimes just writing it down has got it out of my system and has enabled me to solve the problem and just feel a lot better about it –

Ruth Cocksedge

Yeah.

Dr Rachel Morris

– as well. So there’s evidence behind that.

Ruth Cocksedge

There’s evidence behind that, and there must be – although I know – I’m not sure that anyone’s throwing any light on it. But I obviously, you know, have my limitations in terms of academic background, but the – between, you know, putting it in words to another person in a therapy session and putting it on paper, there has to be something about the act of articulating your problem, which allows you to get a new perspective. It’s like when people say in therapy, you know, I didn’t know I thought that until I said it out loud to you.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Ruth Cocksedge

You know, I’m sure that happens in coaching as well I know it. Sometimes as a therapist or a coach, you don’t have to do anything, do you other than let them talk because they find their own solutions. Or they found their own new perspective and whatever buttons.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Ruth Cocksedge

Yeah. The other thing about doing that kind of writing that I’ve found, and maybe this is because I have pursued the creative writing, not just the expressive writing, is that the material you produce in those moments can become something a piece of creative work that you can use in some way. If you want to write poetry, or a story, or a memoir, you know, and stories are the way that we relate to one another. You know, people come to doctors and tell the story of why they’ve come, you know, and – or on they come to therapists to do the same thing. But actually you know it is stories. If we we take them outside of the consulting room, it can be very influential potentially, you think about all those research studies on the effects of this, that, and the other – interventions, you know, what does it feel like? What did – how does someone experience that? We can fill in the gaps if you like between you know, that are in the tables of results about what it was really like to, I don’t know, have CBT or do EMDR, or you know? And I often use those things when I’m talking to clients and send them examples of people who’ve written about their experiences or, you know, talked about it on YouTube or something like that.

Dr Rachel Morris

I think, you know, when we express things in a different way, say through a poem or as a story, it can just help describe things that we find it really hard to actually put into words. I think that’s why we like metaphors and we like parables so much, and poems, and quotes  – like I love certain quotes, which seemed to describe far better anything that I could just say in a paragraph of a speech.

Ruth Cocksedge

Yeah.

Dr Rachel Morris

So I guess it’s a way, it’s a good way of getting the abstracts in there on, on paper as it were.

Ruth Cocksedge

And I think there’s also a lovely genre that I came cross by doing this course you know, which I’m sure money, novels, and stories are in of this ilk, but there’s autobiographical fiction. So that you draw on your own experience, or you use aspects of it, but you don’t, you know if you wrote your memoir, my memoir wouldn’t be that exciting, really. But if I use my experience to tell a different story or a version of my story with more, you know, drama and plots in it, then you know, it gives – it has potential to you know, be greater than itself.

Dr Rachel Morris

So what advice would you give people who were sort of interested in doing some of this stuff? I mean, I guess not, you know, not everyone’s gonna go out and do a masters or can go on retreats or whatever. But are there some small things that one can do in the consulting room, or in your lunch break, or at weekends to just start to do a bit of this?

Ruth Cocksedge

Well, one obvious one that we mentioned is you know, giving yourself time to do a bit of writing about what’s going on for you. You know, the Pennebaker method is 10 minutes a day for four days.

Dr Rachel Morris

Okay.

Ruth Cocksedge

But I think that’s partly because that was how they designed their studies. But that’s all that – they’ve got people to write for 10 minutes a day, for four days, and then they’ve from that, they’ve looked at you know, the impact that’s had across various measures, outcomes – including you know, how often have you been to your doctor if they’re in a sort of patient group or whatever.

Dr Rachel Morris

And they demonstrated good outcomes –

Ruth Cocksedge

Demonstrated good outcomes.

Dr Rachel Morris

Right.

Ruth Cocksedge

Yeah. So expressive writing is very worthwhile. Again, it’s a discipline, a bit like mindfulness. You know, there are times when I do, but they tend to be the times when I’m particularly you know, upset, or worried, or cross or something. Yeah so that’s one way – I mean another way is to enrol on a – some sort of creative writing class, you know, depending on one’s income, then they’re a relatively small investment and, you know, interesting things can come out of it.

Dr Rachel Morris

And what about sort of other methods of creativity? I know that recently I’ve done a pottery course which I absolutely loved.

Ruth Cocksedge

Oh yeah.

Dr Rachel Morris

But I was absolutely terrible. As anyone who’s seen my pots will know, but I really enjoyed it, and for me it was a really great way of getting into flow. You don’t think about anything else and being a bit – I’ve always thought I’m not very creative, but I think everyone is creative –

Ruth Cocksedge

Absolutely.

Dr Rachel Morris

– they just have to find the right way of doing it.

Ruth Cocksedge

I think that’s absolutely, that’s a very key – that everyone has this capacity to play and be creative. That’s different from everybody can be, you know, a novelist or a potter or whatever. But you can do it and have the lesson, and have the benefits of doing it.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Ruth Cocksedge

So there’s a whole area which I haven’t really dipped into very much, which is broader than the creative writing for therapeutic benefit or creative writing for well being, which is arts for health. So you know, across these other genre arts, you know, painting, and drawing, and pottery, and all that – and drama as well. And this is a movement, if you like that’s happening at the moment, and developing a pace. There’s a lot of people kind of involved in that and over heading, or there’s all sorts of projects going on everywhere.

Dr Rachel Morris

I can imagine because, you know, learning and playing is one of the ways to well being. And that’s because it gets you into flow. And I guess there’s nothing like getting into flow like doing creative stuff is there? It’s quite hard to really worry at same time presumably.

Ruth Cocksedge

Yeah, yeah, there’s a lovely sort of state of mind which quite a few people have written about, including the psychoanalysts are not psychoanalytic in orientation, and my way of working nowadays – I was at one stage and there, the idea about free association and things like that, you know, I think it taps into a similar thing. In psychotherapy there’s an idea about reverie as well, when you sort of have – your minds at rest, you just kind of, you know, maybe a day dream will come out of that? And then from that, something creative, particularly in the writing area. I guess also in painting as well. And what you can do is just let your mind wander wherever it wants to and see what happens. That’s another letting go isn’t it? Of sort of, I must be creative now. It’s a sort of, you know, let’s just let it happen.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, yeah.

Ruth Cocksedge

Maybe nothing will, or maybe something will.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Ruth Cocksedge

Doesn’t matter either way really.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, I always think of my best ideas, yeah, when I’m on my bike, when I don’t have a pen and paper in front of me, so when I’m sitting I’m going right, gotta think, think, think, think, think, it never seems to come. But it is at other times, isn’t it?

Ruth Cocksedge

Yeah.

Dr Rachel Morris

Giving yourself those moments. That’s great. So are you running any courses at the moment Ruth or?

Ruth Cocksedge

Well, I have – the answers no. I’ve got a workshop that I’m doing with someone who is in – works in the area of arts for health locally in January, later this month, and I have in mind that I might, I could develop it as part of my practise. So I’d be very interested if anybody would like to do that with me. I mean I have a, you know, a six week course kind of prepared, I guess I need to promote it and you know, find a way; finding people who want to do it is the next step.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah.

Ruth Cocksedge

You know, how to draw people in. I can imagine it could be useful for professionals, or it could be useful, like doctors or other people working in health, or yeah, anybody perhaps whose perhaps been through a therapy and is okay, but kind of is interested to reflect on that as well. Those kind of groups of people I’m thinking of. So I have to find a way to promote that and –

Dr Rachel Morris

Well I’ll get – if anyone’s listening to the podcast who’s interested get them to email you perhaps?

Ruth Cocksedge

Yepp!

Dr Rachel Morris

Find out more about what you could do with them? So if people wanted to get in touch with you, how can they do that?

Ruth Cocksedge

They can contact me by email. That’s probably easier. So it’s Ruth.Cocksedge@icloud.com.

Dr Rachel Morris

Okay, brilliant, and we’ll put the links of everything else that you’ve talked about in the show notes as well.

Ruth Cocksedge

Okay.

Dr Rachel Morris

Before we sort of finish up, do you have any, you know, anything that you’ve noticed over your years working with professionals in high stress jobs, any sort of top tips you’ve got for the many things that seem to have worked really well for people?

Ruth Cocksedge

Ooh gosh, that’s another one of your big questions isn’t it.

Dr Rachel Morris

Yes, I like asking the big questions. Boiling it down to small things.

Ruth Cocksedge

Yes, no, no, I agree. Absolutely. I think it’s things like being kind to yourself, recognising you’re only human, you’re not a robot. You know that you have a body which is, you know, full of emotions and hormones and things that fly around that affect you, and you know, being kind to yourself about those sort of – your own emotional ups and downs and being interested in them as well, sort of accepting them, letting them be. Know to sing them rather than treating them as a threat. The – I suppose the other thing is getting support. So, you know, talking to colleagues, friends, family about how it’s all going and having that support. Being open about what’s bothering you. Yeah.

Dr Rachel Morris

That’s great. So be kind yourself. Be compassionate to yourself. Understand yourself as a human being with all our idiosyncrasies.

Dr Rachel Morris

Foibles.

Dr Rachel Morris

And foibles. And treat yourself like you’d treat your best friend.

Ruth Cocksedge

Ah that’s a good way of summarising it.

Dr Rachel Morris

I think so.

Ruth Cocksedge

Yeah.

Dr Rachel Morris

If we could all do that, I think we’d be a lot healthier wouldn’t we?

Dr Rachel Morris

Yeah, yeah.

Dr Rachel Morris

Great. Well Ruth thank you so much for being on the podcast. Really great to hear from you. Do get in touch with Ruth if you’d like to find out anything more, I’ll put the links in the sow notes below and we will see everybody for the next episode. Thank you.

Ruth Cocksedge

Okay, thanks very much. Bye bye.

Dr Rachel Morris

Thanks for listening. If you’ve enjoyed this episode then please do subscribe to the podcast and also please rate it on iTunes so that other people can find it to. Do follow me on Twitter @DrRachelMorris, and you can find out more about the face to face and online courses which I run at the YouAreNotAFrog.co.uk website. Bye for now.

Episode 20 – A creative solution to stress with Ruth Cocksedge

In this episode, Rachel is joined by Ruth Cocksedge a Practitioner Psychologist who started her career as a mental health nurse. She practices in Cambridge and has a particular interest in EMDR for PTSD and creative writing as a way to improve mental health and wellbeing.

Episode 11 – The magical art of reading sweary books

In this episode, Rachel is joined once again by Dr Liz O’Riordan, the ‘Breast Surgeon with Breast Cancer’, TEDx speaker, author, blogger, triathlete and all round superstar who has been nominated for ‘Woman of the Year’.

Previous Podcasts.

Ways to stay in touch.

Join the community

Fill in just a few details to hear about the latest tools, services and resources designed to help GPs and others members of the Primary Care team become more resourceful and resilient in the workplace.

@ Copyright 2019 Wild Monday Resilience Ltd (Reg no 11673722)

[/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]
2020-01-31T15:10:32+00:00